Humanities on Demand

Sep 30 2014

Paul Doiron: “The Bone Orchard”

This episode is a recording of a talk held on August 27th, 2014 at the Portland Public Library as part of their Brown Bag Lecture Series. We join Paul Doiron as he discusses his newest book, “The Bone Orchard.”

Bestselling author Paul Doiron is the Editor Emeritus of Down East Magazine. He is a native of Maine and a board member of the Maine Humanities Council. Here, he reads from his fifth novel in a series following the life of Maine game warden Mike Bowditch.

“Do I go out of my way to try to portray Maine as a place that is not just Vacationland but includes pockets of poverty and difficult places to write about? Yes, I do,” Doiron says. “I am a Maine native…I have family that has drug and alcohol abuse, lives in dire poverty, and it’s part of Maine. It’s part of the state that we live in, and I wanted to bring that to readers.”


Jun 26 2013

The Transatlantic Friendship: Charles Calhoun on Longfellow and Dickens

As part of Brunswick Downtown Association’s 2013 Longfellow Days series, Charles Calhoun, author of biography Longfellow: A Rediscovered Life, examined the friendship between Longfellow and Charles Dickens.

In this podcast he discusses the writers’ correspondence, Dickens’ visit to The United States, and Longfellow’s to London. Mr. Calhoun spoke to an audience at Bowdoin College’s Moulton Union, on February 13, 2013.

dickenslongfellow

Sketch of Dickens, in 1842, and Longfellow, from c. 1850


May 13 2011

Wrestling a Book Into the World

Maine Festival of the BookWonder what writers really think about? Get ready for a literary extravaganza! The Maine Festival of the Book, brought to you by Maine Reads brings together writers and readers to enjoy readings, panel discussions, book signings, and performances. With the exception of Opening Night and Youth Outreach, festival events are first-come, first-served, un-ticketed seating, and are free. Almost 2000 people attended this year’s three-day event. In its four years of existence, the Maine Festival of the Book has featured more than 200 authors, including five Pulitzer Prize winners.

For more information about The Maine Festival of the Book and to join the mailing list for 2012, check out Maine Read’s website.

Paul Harding, 2010 Pulitzer prize winner for Tinkers and Sarah Braunstein author of Sweet Relief of Missing Children read from their debut novels and talk about art, hysteria, and the long process of bringing a book into existence.

The Maine Festival of the Book is an annual festival brought to you by Maine Reads with support from the Maine Humanities Council.


Jan 13 2011

The Bad News and the Good News with Kate Braestrup

Kate BraestrupKate Braestrup is a Unitarian-Universalist chaplain to the Maine Warden Service, joining the wardens as they search the wild lands and fresh waters of Maine for those who have lost their way, and offering comfort to those who wait for the ones they love to be rescued, or for their bodies to be recovered. Her New York Times bestselling memoir, Here If You Need Me, won the Barnes and Noble Discover Award for nonfiction. Her magazine articles have appeared in The New York Times, the Boston Globe, and O, The Oprah Magazine.

This talk was part of the Literature & Medicine program’s national conference, After Shock: Humanities Perspectives on Trauma, held on November 12 & 13, 2010 in Washington, D.C.


May 24 2010

Franco-American Women’s Words in Maine, Rhea Cote Robbins

Maine Festival of the BookWonder what writers really think about? Get ready for a literary extravaganza! The Maine Festival of the Book, brought to you by Maine Reads brings together writers and readers to enjoy readings, panel discussions, book signings, and performances.  With the exception of Opening Night and Youth Outreach, festival events are first-come, first-served, un-ticketed seating, and are free. Almost 2000 people attended this year’s three-day event. In its four years of existence, the Maine Festival of the Book has featured more than 200 authors, including four Pulitzer Prize winners.

For more information about The Maine Festival of the Book and to join the mailing list for 2011, check out Maine Read’s website.

Rhea Côté RobbinsThis lectured entitled “Franco-American Women’s Words in Maine” featured author, Rhea Côté Robbins, reading from works in progress as well as from previously published titles weaving stories of the French woman’s life on the landscapes in Maine. Trudy Chambers Price was unable to attend, but pieces of her works were also read.

The Maine Festival of the Book is an annual festival brought to you by Maine Reads with support from the Maine Humanities Council.


Oct 23 2009

Poets Writing Memoir: A Conversation with Elizabeth Garber and Dawn Potter

Denise Pendleton, Maine Humanities Council’s Program Director of Born To Read and poet, sat down at the Belfast Free Library with two of Maine’s best-known poets, Elizabeth Garber and Dawn Potter. In addition to reading from their memoirs, the poets spoke about why they turned to prose and how their poetry background has influenced their current writing. Elizabeth W. Garber is the author of two collections of poetry and is currently writing a memoir, The Architect’s Daughter, about growing up in a modern glass house in the 1960’s. Her chapter “Stones” won the Maine Writer’s and Publishers Alliance 2009 Literary Award for unpublished Non-Fiction.  She was voted 2009 Best Writer in Waldo County in a Reader’s Poll conducted by The Village Soup/Republican Journal. Dawn Potter is the author of two collections of poetry and, most recently, a memoir, Tracing Paradise: Two Years in Harmony with John Milton. It recounts her project of copying out every word of John Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost while living an everyday life in the central Maine town of Harmony. According to writer Sam Pickering “Potter writes beautifully. . . . [Her book] made me ponder my life as well as literature, as a good book should but few books do.”


 

Please be aware that the content in these audio files does not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the Maine Humanities Council or any organization with which the Maine Humanities Council is affiliated. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.