Humanities on Demand

Aug 8 2008

Interview with Lizz Sinclair

Lizz Sinclair

Created by the Maine Humanities Council, Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health Care® is a national award-winning reading and discussion program for health care professionals. The Maine Public Broadcasting Network’s Tom Porter interviewed Literature & Medicine Program Officer Lizz Sinclair when the Literature & Medicine anthology, Imagine What It’s Like, was published by the University of Hawai’i Press in the summer of 2008. Here, with permission from MPBN, is a re-broadcast of the interview.


Jun 6 2008

Interview with Ashley Bryan

Ashley BryanBorn and raised in New York City, Ashley Bryan is another author “from away” who has found a home in Maine. Folklorist, writer, illustrator and performer, Bryan draws on African myths and tales, his own and others’ experience, and his literary, artistic and thespian talents to create children’s books (enjoyed by adults, too) and storytellings in schools and other venues, sometimes under the auspices of the Maine Humanities Council. (Read about his appearance at the 2005 Born to Read conference here). Bryan’s newest book is Let it Shine: Three Favorite Spirituals (Simon and Schuster, 2007).

This interview with Ashley Bryan by Charlotte Albright was included in the Council’s 30th Anniversary ‘Maine Writers Speak’ project. To hear more from Bryan, see the Children’s Book Council.


Mar 4 2008

Interview with Hannah Holmes

Hannah HolmesHannah Holmes took a geology class at the University of Southern Maine that led to a career as a science writer, someone who turns the facts of science into stories, sometimes mysteries, with exciting plots and intriguing characters. She has toured the world for Discovery, making the complexities of science comprehensible, and scientists comprehensibly human as well. Much nearer home, she studied her backyard in Suburban Safari: A Year on the Lawn (Bloomsbury, 2005). Her newest book is The Well-Dressed Ape: A Natural History of Myself (Random House, 2009).

This interview with Hannah Holmes by Charlotte Albright was included in the Council’s 30th Anniversary ‘Maine Writers Speak’ project. We welcome your feedback.


Mar 4 2008

Interview with Sara Corbett and Mike Paterniti

Sara Corbett and Mike PaternitiTwo journalists in one Portland household—and both write for the New York Times Magazine. Mike Paterniti and Sara Corbett are often away, however, laying the groundwork for their articles and books. Sometimes alone, as when Paterniti was Driving Mr. Albert: A Trip Across America with Einstein’s Brain (Dell, 2000). (Read an excerpt from the book here.) Sometimes together, as when Corbett recounts her experience of learning Spanish in Spain, in “Learning the Lingua Franca” in Travel and Leisure. Paterniti has won National Magazine Awards for features and profiles; Corbett’s New York Times essay “The Permanent Scars of Iraq” has been widely discussed. Paterniti and Corbett are also co-founders of The Telling Room, a Portland-based writing center designed to nurture and encourage Maine’s next generation of writers.

This interview with Sara Corbett and Mike Paterniti by Charlotte Albright was included in the Council’s 30th Anniversary ‘Maine Writers Speak’ project. Please feel free to leave your feedback below.


Jan 3 2008

Interview with Richard Ford

Richard FordBorn in Mississippi, educated in Michigan and California, a sometime resident of Montana and New Orleans, his Pulitzer Prize-winning Independence Day set in New Jersey, Richard Ford now lives in Maine. And he writes about it: “Charity,” in Contemporary Maine Fiction (Down East Books, 2005), for example, is about people from away who see the possibilities of Maine in very different ways. The considerable debate about whether Ford is a “Southern” or “ex-Southern” writer now has a new dimension, “Maine writer.”

This interview with Richard Ford by Charlotte Albright was included in the Council’s 30th Anniversary ‘Maine Writers Speak’ project. Please feel free to leave your feedback below. What would you like to ask Richard Ford?


Nov 16 2007

Interview with Bill Roorbach

Bill Roorbach

Bill Roorbach has written about a very personal part of Maine. Temple Stream (Dell, 2005) considers the stream that borders the fields below his house in Farmington; it won the nonfiction Maine Literary Award. His stories and novels deal with equally real and natural people. And he produces “teacherly tomes” on memoirs, essays, and Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: The Art of Truth (Oxford University Press, 2001).

This interview with Bill Roorbach by Charlotte Albright was included in the Council’s 30th Anniversary ‘Maine Writers Speak’ project. Please feel free to leave your feedback below.


 

Please be aware that the content in these audio files does not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the Maine Humanities Council or any organization with which the Maine Humanities Council is affiliated. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.