Podcasts

Humanities on Demand

Reza Jalali

Podcast | Demystifying Islam in “Palace Walk”

MHC Board Member Reza Jalali discusses the Winter Weekend 2017 text, Palace Walk, at Merrill Memorial Library in Yarmouth. A Muslim scholar, educator, and writer, he is the coordinator of multicultural student affairs at the University of Southern Maine and advises Muslim students at Bowdoin College. His most recent work includes the 2013 book Homesick Mosque and Other Stories… Read more

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Podcast | 20 Years of Winter Weekend

Listen to Winter Weekend founder and emcee Charles Calhoun reminisce about 20 years of Winter Weekend in our latest Humanities on Demand podcast. Read more

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Civil Rights Team Project

Podcast | Maine’s Civil Rights Teams

On Monday, May 23, 2016, over 500 students and teachers gathered at the Augusta Civic Center for the Civil Rights Team Project State Conference. Hosted by the Office of the Maine Attorney General, the conference was the first event of its kind since 2010. In addition to schools attending from across the state, the event… Read more

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Seeking Refuge

Podcast | Seeking Refuge: Understanding the Refugee and Asylum Process

In February 2016, the Maine Humanities Council held Seeking Refuge: Understanding the Refugee and Asylum Process, a free, public, panel discussion that broke down the process here in Maine. Discussion touched on the screening that determines who can come to the U.S., the policies and laws supporting the process, and the everyday logistics of refugees… Read more

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14th Forum

Podcast | The 14th Amendment: A Living Document

This is a recording of our public forum The 14th Amendment: A Living Document, held in partnership with the University of Maine School of Law on June 1, 2016, at Portland Public Library. The event was moderated by Danielle Conway, Dean of the University of Maine School of Law, and features guests Kenneth W. Mack, the… Read more

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Patrick Rael

Podcast | Patrick Rael | Eighty-Eight Years: The Long Death of Slavery in the United States

Patrick Rael, professor of history at Bowdoin College, discusses his latest book Eighty-Eight Years: The Long Death of Slavery in the United States, 1777-1865, which explores the Atlantic history of slavery to understand the exceptionally long period of time it took to end chattel bondage in America (you can read more about the project here)…. Read more

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Isabel Alvarez-Borland

Podcast | Isabel Alvarez-Borland | Language as Theme in “One Hundred Years of Solitude”

Isabel Alvarez-Borland, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Humanities in the Department of Spanish at the College of the Holy Cross, examines of the role of language and identity in One Hundred Years of Solitude at Winter Weekend 2016. Her books include Cuban-American Literature of Exile: From Person to Persona (1999) and Discontinuidad y ruptura en Guillermo… Read more

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Susanne Moser

Podcast | Susanne Moser | The Hard Work of Hope: Sustenance in Times of Climate Change

Speaking at the Dorothy Schwartz Forum on Art, Science, and the Humanities on October 24, 2015,  Susanne Moser discusses the importance of hope in confronting climate change. Susanne’s work focuses on adaptation to climate change, vulnerability, resilience, climate change communication, social change, decision support and the interaction between scientists, policy-makers and the public. She is a geographer by… Read more

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Thomas Tracy

Podcast | Thomas Tracy | Climate Change as a Moral Challenge

Speaking at the Dorothy Schwartz Forum on Art, Science, and the Humanities on October 24, 2015,  Thomas F. Tracy, Philipps Professor of Religious Studies at Bates College, discusses moral challenges in confronting climate change. Professor Tracy’s research focuses on issues in philosophy of religion and theology, and to a lesser degree, on topics in applied ethics, particularly… Read more

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Matthew Pettway

Podcast | Matthew Pettway | 100 Years of Solitude: Reading Through the Invisibility of Race

Matthew Pettway, Bates College, deconstructs the classic Latin American novel “100 Years of Solitude” through the lens of race at Winter Weekend on March 12, 2016. Matthew Pettway completed his doctorate in Hispanic Cultural Studies at Michigan State University in June 2010. Dr. Pettway joined the faculty at Bates College in August of the same year… Read more

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Podcast | Allen Wells | The Banana Strike, La Violencia, and the Cuban Revolution’s Impact on García Márquez’ One Hundred Years of Solitude

A speaker at Winter Weekend 2016, Allen Wells discusses “Interpreting the Past through the Prism of the Present:  The Banana Strike, La Violencia, and the Cuban Revolution’s Impact on García Márquez’ One Hundred Years of Solitude”.  Allen Wells is the Roger Howell, Jr. Professor of History at Bowdoin College. His scholarship focuses on modern Mexican history,… Read more

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Esther Rojas and Marianella Rojas, Sudacas

Video | Sudacas | A Taste of Colombian Music

The band Sudacas, composed of Berklee College of Music students, performed a few songs and shared some background on Colombian rhythms and instrumentation on March 12, 2016, at Winter Weekend. Sudacas was founded by Marianella Rojas (Venezuela, voice and percussion), and Esther Rojas (Colombia, bass). The duet creates a fusion of traditional music from their native countries with… Read more

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Matthew Pettway

Video | Matthew Pettway | 100 Years of Solitude: Reading Through the Invisibility of Race

Matthew Pettway, Bates College, deconstructs the classic Latin American novel “100 Years of Solitude” through the lens of race at Winter Weekend on March 12, 2016. Matthew Pettway completed his doctorate in Hispanic Cultural Studies at Michigan State University in June 2010.  Dr. Pettway joined the faculty at Bates College in August of the same… Read more

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Ilan Stavans

Podcast | Ilan Stavans | One Hundred Years of Solitude: The Bible of Latin America

Professor Ilan Stavans gave the keynote talk at our Winter Weekend program on March 11, 2016. He is the Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College where his teaching interests include popular culture in Hispanic America, world Jewish writers, and the cultural history of the Spanish language.     Read more

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Ilan Stavans

Video | Ilan Stavans | 100 Years of Solitude: The Bible of Latin America

Professor Ilan Stavans, Amherst College, gave the keynote talk at our Winter Weekend program on March 11, 2016. Ilan Stavans, Amherst College, has taught courses on a wide array of topics such as Spanglish, Jorge Luis Borges, modern American poetry, Latin music,Don Quixote, Gabriel García Márquez, Modernismo, popular culture in Hispanic America, world Jewish writers,… Read more

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Reza Jalali

Podcast | Reza Jalali | Muslim in America

MHC Board Member Reza Jalali discusses the lives of Muslims in the U.S. and gives an overview of Islam, a faith practiced by many of our neighbors. This talk was recorded on December 16, 2015 at Portland Public Library. A Muslim scholar, educator, and writer, he is the coordinator of multicultural student affairs at the University… Read more

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Gabe Ferris

Listen to Maine Student Read Award Winning Letter to Author

Gabriel Ferris, 13, of Waterville Junior High School, beat 21,713 national submissions to win first place in Level 2 of this year’s national Letters About Literature contest for his letter to Walter Isaacson, author of the biography Steve Jobs. Gabriel’s  letter poses a question highly relevant for modern culture: “Is excess a requirement for extreme success?… Read more

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Allen Wells

Podcast | Allen Wells | Winter Weekend 2016 Preview: Gabriel García Márquez and One Hundred Years of Solitude

In this special “Humanities on Demand” we preview Winter Weekend 2016 with Allen Wells, Professor of History at Bowdoin College. Professor Wells discusses “The Writing of One Hundred Years of Solitude: Gabriel García Márquez, Colombia’s La Violencia, and the Cuban Revolution During the Cold War” This talk was recorded on October 2, 2015 at the Brunswick Inn Read more

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Robert Frost

Podcast | John Ward | Robert Frost: The Impossibility of Interpretation

In this episode of “Humanities on Demand,” we join John Ward at the McArthur Public Library in Biddeford for “Robert Frost: The Impossibility of Interpretation.” This talk was held on July 15, 2015 as a Taste of the Humanities event. Scholar John Ward, formerly of Centre College and Kenyon College, reads and discusses a selection… Read more

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The Precipice book cover

Podcast | Paul Doiron | Murder on the Appalachian Trail

This episode is a recording of a talk held on June 11, 2015 at Gould Academy in Bethel, Maine. We join Paul Doiron as he discusses the ethics of fiction writing and his newest book, The Precipice, in the talk “Murder on the Appalachian Trail.” The Precipice is the sixth novel in a series following… Read more

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Lily King

Podcast | Lily King | Euphoria

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcasts is a recording of a talk held on May 13th, 2015 at the Portland Public Library as part of their Brown Bag Lecture Series. We join Maine author Lily King as she discusses her book, “Euphoria.” She is introduced by Josh Bodwell of the… Read more

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David Blight

Podcast | David Blight | The Civil War in American Memory

This episode is a recording of a talk held on May 7th, 2015 at the Portland Public Library as the culminating event in the three-year Local & Legendary: Maine in the Civil War project run by the Maine Humanities Council and Maine Historical Society with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. We join David Blight… Read more

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Gary Rainford

Podcast | Gary Rainford | Swan’s Island Poetry

Welcome to the Maine Humanities Council’s ‘Humanities on Demand’ podcast series. This episode is a recording of a poetry talk by Gary Rainford, part of the Portland Public Library’s Friday Local Authors Series. This talk was held on April 17th, 2015. Gary Rainford lives on Swan’s Island in Maine year-round with his wife and daughter…. Read more

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Stephanie Yuhl Winter Weekend

Podcast | Stephanie Yuhl | The Resonant Strings of Remembering: The Visual Culture of Faulkner’s Plantation South

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s ‘Humanities on Demand’ podcast series is a recording of Stephanie Yuhl’s talk, “The Resonant Strings of remembering: The Visual Culture of Faulkner’s Plantation South.” This was recorded at Bowdoin College on March 7, 2015, as part of Winter Weekend 2015 with Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! Dr. Yuhl, a specialist in… Read more

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John Matthews Winter Weekend 2015

Podcast | John Matthews | Absalom, Absalom!: A Story of Stories.

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcast series is a recording of John Matthews’s talk, “Absalom, Absalom!: A Story of Stories.” This talk was recorded at Bowdoin College on March 7, 2015, as part of Winter Weekend 2015 with William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! Dr. Matthews is a Professor of English at… Read more

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The Feminist Project 2

Podcast | The Feminist Project

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcast series is a recording of “The Feminist Project,” an event put on at the University of Maine at Machias on April 27th, 2015 as part of the Maine Humanities Council’s Student Humanities Ambassador program. “If not me, then who? If not now, then when?”… Read more

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Don_Dearborn

Podcast | Don Dearborn: How Darwin’s Mind Worked

  This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcast series is a recording of the talk “How Darwin’s Mind Worked,” by Don Dearborn. His lecture was part of the first annual Dorothy Schwartz Forum on Art, Science, and the Humanities. It was held on November 15th, 2014, and focused on the topic… Read more

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Bernd Heinrich Why Darwin Matters

Podcast | Why Darwin Matters: A Q & A with Bernd Heinrich

  This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcast series features a Q&A with biologist, writer, and runner Bernd Heinrich. The talk was recorded during the first annual Dorothy Schwartz Forum on Art, Science, and the Humanities, held on November 15th, 2014, at the University of New England’s Portland Campus. It focused… Read more

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Cedric Gael Bryant Winter Weekend 2015

Podcast | Cedric Gael Bryant | Reading Metaphor, Race, and the Problem of Knowing in “Absalom, Absalom!”

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcast series is a recording of Cedric Gael Bryant’s talk, “Reading Metaphor, Race, and the Problem of Knowing in Absalom, Absalom!.” This talk was recorded at Bowdoin College on March 7, 2015, as part of Winter Weekend 2015 with William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! Dr. Bryant… Read more

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William Ferris

Podcast | William Ferris | Memory and Sense of Place: William Faulkner and the American South

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s ‘Humanities on Demand’ podcast series is a recording of William Ferris’s talk, “Memory and Sense of Place: William Faulkner and the American South.” This was recorded at Bowdoin College on March 6, 2015, as part of Winter Weekend 2015 with Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! A widely recognized leader in Southern studies, African American music,… Read more

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Charles Calhoun Winter Weekend

Podcast | Charles Calhoun | My Kinsman Thomas Sutpen: Reflections on the Southern Past

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcast series is a recording of Charles Calhoun’s talk, “My Kinsman Thomas Sutpen: Reflections on the Southern Past.” This talk was recorded at Bowdoin College on March 7, 2015, as part of Winter Weekend 2015 with William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! Born in Louisiana, Charles Calhoun is… Read more

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Podcast Janet Browne

Podcast | Janet Browne: Darwin Revisited in the 21st Century

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcast series is a recording of the talk “Darwin Revisited in the 21st Century,” by Janet Browne. Her lecture was part of the first annual Dorothy Schwartz Forum on Art, Science, and the Humanities. It was held on November 15th, 2014, and focused on the… Read more

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Podcast Brock Clarke

Brock Clarke: “The Happiest People in the World”

This episode is a recording of a talk held on January 14, 2015, at the Portland Public Library as part of its Brown Bag Lecture Series. We join Maine author Brock Clarke as he discusses his newest book, The Happiest People in the World. As Bob Keyes of the Portland Press Herald stated in his introduction to the talk, “Last week’s terrorist attacks… Read more

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Charles Calhoun Great Books

Charles Calhoun: Great Books

In this episode we join Charles Calhoun, author of the biography Longfellow: A Rediscovered Life and founder/emcee of Winter Weekend for a talk on great books. This is a recording of an event held on July 21, 2014 at the Thornton Oaks Retirement Community in Brunswick, Maine. Calhoun discusses the definition of a great book and… Read more

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Christoph Irmscher

Podcast | Christoph Irmscher | Darwin and Agassiz: How Two Scientists Saw the Galapagos So Differently

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s ‘Humanities on Demand’ podcast series is a recording from the first annual Dorothy Schwartz Forum on Art, Science, and the Humanities. It was held on November 15th, 2014, and focused on the topic “Why Darwin Matters.” Christoph Irmscher is a biographer of Louis Agassiz, a contemporary opponent of Charles… Read more

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Debby Irving

Debby Irving: Waking Up White

This episode is a recording of a talk held on September 10th, 2014 at the Portland Public Library as part of their Brown Bag Lecture Series. We join Debbie Irving as she discusses her book, Waking Up White. Debby Irving, Racial Justice Educator and Writer, and Shay Stewart-Bouley, Executive Director of Community Change, Inc., author… Read more

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Podcast Tim O'Brien

Rebroadcast: Tim O’Brien – Two Heads and the Things They Carried

In honor of the launch of Coming Home: A Reading Group for Combat Veterans, we are rebroadcasting an updated version of a talk by author and veteran Tim O’Brien. This was part of the Literature & Medicine program’s national conference, After Shock: Humanities Perspectives on Trauma, held on November 12 & 13, 2010 in Washington, D.C. Tim O’Brien has been… Read more

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Paul Doiron

Paul Doiron: The Bone Orchard

This episode is a recording of a talk held on August 27th, 2014 at the Portland Public Library as part of their Brown Bag Lecture Series. We join Paul Doiron as he discusses his newest book, “The Bone Orchard.” Bestselling author Paul Doiron is the Editor Emeritus of Down East Magazine. He is a native… Read more

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Podcast Tim O'Brien

Rebroadcast: Tim O’Brien – Two Heads and the Things They Carried

In honor of the launch of Coming Home: A Reading Group for Combat Veterans, we are rebroadcasting an updated version of a talk by author and veteran Tim O’Brien. This was part of the Literature & Medicine program’s national conference, After Shock: Humanities Perspectives on Trauma, held on November 12 & 13, 2010 in Washington, D.C. Tim O’Brien has… Read more

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Podcast John Ward

Podcast | John Ward | Teach Me Now To Listen: A Retrospective on Seamus Heaney

In this episode we join John Ward at the Jackson Memorial Library in Tenant’s Harbor for “Teach Me Now to Listen: A Retrospective on Seamus Heaney.” This talk was held on  April 9, 2014 as a Taste of the Humanities event. Scholar John Ward, formerly of Centre College and Kenyon College, discusses the Irish poet… Read more

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Podcast Ray Miller

Raymond Miller: An “Unhappy Wanderer” on the Streets of St. Petersburg: Raskolnikov as Superfluous Man

This talk was delivered on March 8th as part of Winter Weekend 2014, Crime and Punishment. In it, Raymond Miller discusses the phenomenon of the superfluous man in Russian literature, and the ways in which Crime and Punishment’s Raskolnikov does and does not fit with his predecessors in that category. Raymond Miller is recently retired… Read more

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Podcast Julie Buckler

Julie Buckler: Dostoevsky’s St. Petersburg

Julie Buckler is Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Comparative Literature at Harvard University. She specializes in the cultural heritage of Imperial Russia. Buckler is author of The Literacy Lorgnette: Attending Opera in Imperial Russia and Mapping St. Petersburg: Imperial Text and Cityscape. Her new book project is titled Cultural Properties: The Afterlife of… Read more

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Podcast Gregory Freeze

Gregory Freeze: Dostoevsky and Russian Orthodoxy

In this talk, delivered on March 8th as part of Winter Weekend 2014, Gregory Freeze presents Dostoevsky and Russian Orthodoxy. Freeze is a professor of history at Brandeis, where he teaches courses on 19th and 20th-century Russian and German history. He is currently preparing two volumes, one a study of Church and Believers in Imperial… Read more

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Podcast Bill Todd

William Todd: Literature as a Profession in Dostoevsky’s Russia

Welcome to another of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcasts. Here, Professor William Todd gives a talk during Winter Weekend 2014 entitled Literature as a Profession in Dostoevsky’s Russia. Todd is Harry Tuchman Levin Professor of Literature at Harvard University, where he has taught Russian and Comparative Literature since 1988. His publications include… Read more

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Podcast Robin Miller

Robin Miller on Crime & Punishment: The Hum and Buzz of Implication

In this talk, delivered on March 7th as part of Winter Weekend 2014, Robin Feur Miller discusses Dostoevsky’s Crime & Punishment. She analyzes different readings of the novel and studies it through the lens of Dostoevsky’s own notebooks and letters. Miller is a professor of the humanities at Brandeis University. She teaches and studies the… Read more

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Podcast The Thinking Heart

Rebroadcast: The Thinking Heart

In this episode we revisit Martin Steingesser’s The Thinking Heart in honor of its inclusion in one of our recent grants. A 2013 grant brought the performance to Bates College, where it was very well received. Here we hear a recording made in 2009 of The Thinking Heart, A Performance in Two Voices with Cello by… Read more

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The Lonely Fight exhibit, Frannie Peabody Center

The Lonely Fight: A History of AIDS in Maine

  Katie Rutherford of the Frannie Peabody Center discusses the creation of ‘The Lonely Fight: a History of AIDS in Maine,’ from the first stages of research to the final reception. She shares the difficulties of tackling a tough subject and the responses that made it worthwhile. ‘The Lonely Fight’ ran from December 1-6, 2013… Read more

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Podcast Lillian Nayder

A change that did him good: Lillian Nayder on Dickens, Women, Violence, Cure

In his introduction to this lecture given on March 9, 2013, scholar Charles Calhoun states, “In our own lifetime, I think one of the major events in Dickens scholarship has been the appearance of a biography by our next speaker, Lillian Nayder. And that is The Other Dickens: A Life of Catherine Hogarth .” Lillian Nayder… Read more

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Podcast Rosemarie Bodenheimer

Rosemarie Bodenheimer: Class, Shame and Aspiration

This talk was given on March 9, 2013 at Bowdoin College as part of the 2013 Winter Weekend programming. Rosemarie Bodenheimer is an English professor at Boston College and author  of  Knowing Dickens.  In this podcast she states, “Great Expectations is Dickens’s most profound exploration of shame and its perverse effects on the psychology of its hero.” Bodenheimer explores… Read more

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Podcast Diane Sadoff

Great Expectations: Dianne Sadoff on the Dickens Legacy and its Cinematic Afterlife

Dianne Sadoff, Professor of English at Rutgers University and author of Victorian Vogue: British Novels on Screen, delivered this talk as part of the 2013 Winter Weekend programming. The talk was held on March 9, 2013 at Bowdoin College. In this podcast she sets Great Expectations in the context of Dickens’s rise to fame and… Read more

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Podcast Dickens

The Transatlantic Friendship: Charles Calhoun on Longfellow and Dickens

As part of Brunswick Downtown Association’s 2013 Longfellow Days series, Charles Calhoun, author of biography Longfellow: A Rediscovered Life, examined the friendship between Longfellow and Charles Dickens. In this podcast he discusses the writers’ correspondence, Dickens’ visit to The United States, and Longfellow’s to London. Mr. Calhoun spoke to an audience at Bowdoin College’s Moulton Union, on February… Read more

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Podcast Ann Kibbie

Ann Kibbie, On the Brink of the Grave: Early Stories of Blood Transfusion

Ann Kibbie, MHC board member and Associate Professor of English at Bowdoin College shares research from her latest project. Professor Kibbie focuses on the the medical and cultural history of transfusion before the twentieth century, from the ill-fated experiments of the late seventeenth century to the re-introduction of the practice in nineteenth-century England. The early… Read more

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Podcast Voices of Light

Voices of Light as performed by The Choral Art Society

Last month, Maine Humanities Council sponsored a performance of Richard Einhorn’s “Voices of Light” as a live soundtrack to Carl Theodore Dreyer’s silent film classic “The Passion of Joan of Arc.” This podcast features a clip from the performance, which took place on Sept. 29 at Hannaford Hall in Portland, and some comments on the… Read more

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Podcast Tony Horowitz

Maine Festival of the Book Opening Night: Tony Horwitz on John Brown

Wonder what writers really think about? Get ready for a literary extravaganza! The Maine Festival of the Book, brought to you by Maine Reads, brings together writers and readers to enjoy readings, panel discussions, book signings and performances. With the exception of Opening Night and Youth Outreach, festival events are first-come, first-served with free, un-ticketed… Read more

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Podcast Joel Rosenthal

War, Peace, and Conflict Resolution: What Homer Has to Teach Us

This year’s Winter Weekend selection, Homer’s The Iliad, translated by Robert Fagles, takes place over 51 days, somewhere in the 9th or 10th year of the Trojan War. Amid a huge cast of memorable characters—and a crew of scheming Olympians sublimely indifferent to human suffering — three warriors stand out: the godlike and self-absorbed Achilles,… Read more

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Podcast Peter Aicher

Was There a Troy and Why Does It Matter?

This year’s Winter Weekend selection, Homer’s The Iliad, translated by Robert Fagles, takes place over 51 days, somewhere in the 9th or 10th year of the Trojan War. Amid a huge cast of memorable characters—and a crew of scheming Olympians sublimely indifferent to human suffering — three warriors stand out: the godlike and self-absorbed Achilles,… Read more

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Podcast Caroline Alexander

Reading the Iliad in 2012

The 2012 Winter Weekend selection, Homer’s The Iliad, translated by Robert Fagles, takes place over 51 days, somewhere in the 9th or 10th year of the Trojan War. Amid a huge cast of memorable characters—and a crew of scheming Olympians sublimely indifferent to human suffering—three warriors stand out: the godlike and self-absorbed Achilles, the Tony… Read more

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Jim Melcher

What is the role of Margaret Chase Smith in Today’s American Politics?

In an encore performance, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Maine Farmington, Jim Melcher spoke to a class on the legacy of Senator Margaret Chase Smith. This talk was originially performed at the September 30, 2011 event The Politics of Conscience: Margaret Chase Smith and Today’s Political Climate at G.W. Hinckley, Hinckley,… Read more

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Podcast Maine Festival of the Book

Maine Festival of the Book Opening Night: Stewart O’Nan and Julia Glass

Wonder what writers really think about? Get ready for a literary extravaganza! The Maine Festival of the Book, brought to you by Maine Reads brings together writers and readers to enjoy readings, panel discussions, book signings, and performances. With the exception of Opening Night and Youth Outreach, festival events are first-come, first-served, un-ticketed seating, and… Read more

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Podcast Adam Hochschild

To End all Wars with Adam Hochschild

As the opening event of the newly minted Mechaya Center, Director Jonathan Lee, invited Adam Hochschild to Maine to discuss new new book To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914 – 1918, where he focuses on the long-ignored moral drama of World War I critics, alongside its generals and heroes. This… Read more

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Podcast Christopher Corbett

From Far East to Old West: True Tales of the American Frontier

Wonder what writers really think about? Get ready for a literary extravaganza! The Maine Festival of the Book, brought to you by Maine Reads brings together writers and readers to enjoy readings, panel discussions, book signings, and performances. With the exception of Opening Night and Youth Outreach, festival events are first-come, first-served, un-ticketed seating, and… Read more

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Podcast Adrian Johns

The Crisis of Intellectual Property

The Center for Global Humanities is a public forum dedicated to the study of human destiny in the 21st century. Because new discoveries in science and technology are changing our understanding of human nature and raising burning questions about the future of our civilization, the Center uses the lenses of the humanities to provide insight… Read more

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Podcast Ted Gup

How The Great Depression Changed America

The Center for Global Humanities is a public forum dedicated to the study of human destiny in the 21st century. Because new discoveries in science and technology are changing our understanding of human nature and raising burning questions about the future of our civilization, the Center uses the lenses of the humanities to provide insight… Read more

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Podcast Charles Calhoun Red & Black

How To Lose Your Head When All About Are Keeping Theirs: Julien, Mathilde, and the Agony of Romanticism

The 2011 Winter Weekend selection, Stendhal’s The Red and the Black follows a young intellectual man from a provincial town who tries to make it in 19th century Paris. Stendhal’s psychological portrait of Julien Sorel and his love affairs mesh well with a satiric depiction of religious and society life. Charles Calhoun, independent scholar for… Read more

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Podcast Melissa Coleman

There and Back: The Journey to Write a Memoir

Wonder what writers really think about? Get ready for a literary extravaganza! The Maine Festival of the Book, brought to you by Maine Reads brings together writers and readers to enjoy readings, panel discussions, book signings, and performances. With the exception of Opening Night and Youth Outreach, festival events are first-come, first-served, un-ticketed seating, and… Read more

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Podcast David P. Barash

The Hare and the Tortoise: A General Biocultural Theory of Why People Have So Many Problems

The Center for Global Humanities is a public forum dedicated to the study of human destiny in the 21st century. Because new discoveries in science and technology are changing our understanding of human nature and raising burning questions about the future of our civilization, the Center uses the lenses of the humanities to provide insight… Read more

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Podcast Wrestling a Book

Wrestling a Book Into the World

Wonder what writers really think about? Get ready for a literary extravaganza! The Maine Festival of the Book, brought to you by Maine Reads brings together writers and readers to enjoy readings, panel discussions, book signings, and performances. With the exception of Opening Night and Youth Outreach, festival events are first-come, first-served, un-ticketed seating, and… Read more

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Podcast Beth Dewolfe

Desperate for Some Kindness: A History of Asking for Help in Hard Times

The Center for Global Humanities is a public forum dedicated to the study of human destiny in the 21st century. Because new discoveries in science and technology are changing our understanding of human nature and raising burning questions about the future of our civilization, the Center uses the lenses of the humanities to provide insight… Read more

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Podcast Mary Rice-DeFosse

Pens and Pistol Shots: Crimes of Passion in Stendhal’s France

The 2011 Winter Weekend selection, Stendhal’s The Red and the Black follows a young intellectual man from a provincial town who tries to make it in 19th century Paris. Stendhal’s psychological portrait of Julien Sorel and his love affairs mesh well with a satiric depiction of religious and society life. Mary Rice-DeFosse, Professor of French… Read more

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Podcast Theresa McBride

Intimate Matters: Sex and Social Class in Post-Revolutionary France

The 2011 Winter Weekend selection, Stendhal’s The Red and the Black follows a young intellectual man from a provincial town who tries to make it in 19th century Paris. Stendhal’s psychological portrait of Julien Sorel and his love affairs mesh well with a satiric depiction of religious and society life. Theresa McBride, Chair of the History… Read more

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Kate Braestrup

The Bad News and the Good News with Kate Braestrup

Kate Braestrup is a Unitarian-Universalist chaplain to the Maine Warden Service, joining the wardens as they search the wild lands and fresh waters of Maine for those who have lost their way, and offering comfort to those who wait for the ones they love to be rescued, or for their bodies to be recovered. Her… Read more

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Podcast Jonathan Shay

Learning About Combat Trauma From Homer’s Iliad with Dr. Jonathan Shay

Jonathan Shay, MD, PhD is a clinical psychiatrist whose treatment of combat trauma suffered by Vietnam veterans combined with his critical and imaginative interpretations of the ancient accounts of battle described in Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey are deepening our understanding of the effects of warfare on the individual. His book, Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma… Read more

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Podcast Gregory Gallant

Margaret Chase Smith and Cold War America

History Camp is a one week seminar for high school students who enjoy history. Each history camp theme is related to a Maine person, historical site, or event in United States history and may be offered in collaboration with a history-related organization. One of this year’s camps, titled “The Cold War, McCarthyism, and Margaret Chase… Read more

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Podcast Graphic novelist Nicole Chaison

There Are No New Stories: Nicole Chaison, Debra Spark and Elizabeth Searle

Wonder what writers really think about? Get ready for a literary extravaganza! The Maine Festival of the Book, brought to you by Maine Reads brings together writers and readers to enjoy readings, panel discussions, book signings, and performances. With the exception of Opening Night and Youth Outreach, festival events are first-come, first-served, un-ticketed seating, and… Read more

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Podcast Reawakening of Ayn Rand

The Reawakening of Ayn Rand, Anne C. Heller

Wonder what writers really think about? Get ready for a literary extravaganza! The Maine Festival of the Book, brought to you by Maine Reads brings together writers and readers to enjoy readings, panel discussions, book signings, and performances. With the exception of Opening Night and Youth Outreach, festival events are first-come, first-served, un-ticketed seating, and… Read more

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Podcast Rhea Côté Robbins

Franco-American Women’s Words in Maine, Rhea Cote Robbins

Wonder what writers really think about? Get ready for a literary extravaganza! The Maine Festival of the Book, brought to you by Maine Reads brings together writers and readers to enjoy readings, panel discussions, book signings, and performances.  With the exception of Opening Night and Youth Outreach, festival events are first-come, first-served, un-ticketed seating, and… Read more

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Podcast Diane Sadoff

The Reading Nation at Mid-Century: George Eliot’s Critics, Contemporaries, and Publishers

The Council’s annual Winter Weekend, a humanities seminar on a classic text, provides an opportunity for readers to confront, in a group setting, an important work of literature. Held at Bowdoin College in early March, the program begins with a Friday evening lecture and dinner (a gastronomic taste of the time and culture reflected in… Read more

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Charles Calhoun

Why Was There No British Revolution? The Political Economy of Middlemarch

The Council’s annual Winter Weekend, a humanities seminar on a classic text, provides an opportunity for readers to confront, in a group setting, an important work of literature. Held at Bowdoin College in early March, the program begins with a Friday evening lecture and dinner (a gastronomic taste of the time and culture reflected in… Read more

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Podcast Amy A Kass

Sympathy, Love and Marriage: Effective Reform in Middlemarch

The Council’s annual Winter Weekend, a humanities seminar on a classic text, provides an opportunity for readers to confront, in a group setting, an important work of literature. Held at Bowdoin College in early March, the program begins with a Friday evening lecture and dinner (a gastronomic taste of the time and culture reflected in… Read more

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Podcast David Carey

Cuba and the United States

David Carey, Jr. is an associate professor of History and Women’s Studies at the University of Southern Maine. He holds a Ph.D. in Latin American Studies from Tulane University; his publications include Ojer taq tzijob’äl kichin ri Kaqchikela’ Winaqi’ (A History of the Kaqchikel People) (Q’anilsa Ediciones, 2004) and Engendering Mayan History: Mayan Women as… Read more

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Podcast Allen Wells

Colonial Legacies: Cuba and Latin America

Allen Wells, the Roger Howell, Jr. Professor of History at Bowdoin College, scholarship has focused on modern Mexican history, especially Yucatán. His most recent book is Tropical Zion: General Trujillo, FDR and the Jews of Sosúa. Professor Wells is the first in our series of podcasts from our December, 2009 event: Cuban Exceptionalism: Reflections on… Read more

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Reza Jalali

First Mainers and New Mainers: Dignity in Diversity

Listen to the inaugural event that launched the new minor of Holocaust, Genocide and Human Rights Studies at the University of Maine, Augusta. This program was hosted by the Director, Abraham Peck at the Michael Klahr Center in Augusta. The panel discussion: First Mainers and New Mainers was part of a project entitled The Dignity… Read more

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Podcast Tess Chakkalakal

The Politics of Zora Neale Hurston

Tess Chakkalakal, Assistant Professor of Africana Studies and English at Bowdoin College, is the last in our series of podcasts from our October, 2009 event: Looking for Zora: The Many Lives of Zora Neale Hurston. This one day event explored the life and lasting work of Hurston, an anthropologist with a literary sensibility. Chakkalakal led… Read more

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Podcast Kate Miles

Seeing Green

Kate Miles, Associate Professor of Environmental Writing at Unity College, is the third in our series of podcasts from our October, 2009 event: Looking for Zora: The Many Lives of Zora Neale Hurston. This one day event explored the life and lasting work of Hurston, an anthropologist with a literary sensibility. Miles’ lecture, entitled, Seeing… Read more

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Podcast Cheryl Townsend Gilkes

Worlds in their Mouths

Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, the John D. and Catharine T. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and African-American Studies at Colby College, is the second in our series of podcasts from our October, 2009 event: Looking for Zora: The Many Lives of Zora Neale Hurston. This one day event explored the life and lasting work of Hurston, an… Read more

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Podcast Cedric Gael Bryant

Looking for and Finding Zora Neale Hurston

Cedric Gael Bryant, Lee Family Professor of English at Colby College, is the first in our series of podcasts from our October, 2009 event: Looking for Zora: The Many Lives of Zora Neale Hurston. This one day event explored the life and lasting work of Hurston, an anthropologist with a literary sensibility. Bryant’s lecture, entitled,… Read more

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Podcast Elizabeth Garber

Poets Writing Memoir: A Conversation with Elizabeth Garber and Dawn Potter

Denise Pendleton, Maine Humanities Council’s Program Director of Born To Read and poet, sat down at the Belfast Free Library with two of Maine’s best-known poets, Elizabeth Garber and Dawn Potter. In addition to reading from their memoirs, the poets spoke about why they turned to prose and how their poetry background has influenced their… Read more

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Podcast Richard Russo

That Old Cape Magic, Richard Russo

For the kick-off of the new season of the Portland Public Library’s brown-bag lunch series, Pulitzer Prize winning author, Richard Russo, came back to Portland to read from his new novel That Old Cape Magic. Despite being a Yankees fan, Russo lives in Coastal Maine. Here, Russo reads a colorful chapter of his newly released… Read more

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Annie Finch

Faculty Flash Reading

In the “flash reading” by Stonecoast MFA program faculty members, each writer gets three minutes in which to share his or her work before introducing the next writer in the queue. The flash reading from Stonecoast’s summer residency in July 2009 began with an introduction by director Annie Finch. Joan Connor started the reading with… Read more

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Podcast Brad Babson

Today’s Challenges on the Korean Peninsula

Brad Babson is a consultant on East Asia and global development issues. He served 26 years with the World Bank, most recently as Senior Advisor for the East Asia and Pacific Region, with assignments including Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam. He has published widely on topics related to East and Southeast Asia,… Read more

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Podcast Not Norman

Not Norman

Not Norman by Kelly Bennett, illustrated by Noah Z. Jones, is one of five books that Raising Readers included in an anthology of Maine stories for pediatricians to give to 5-year-olds. Noah Z. Jones lives in Maine, and recently read Not Norman aloud for the Born to Read program. You can find this book, or… Read more

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Podcast Love and Kisses

Love and Kisses

Love and Kisses by Sarah Wilson, illustrated by Melissa Sweet, is one of five books that Raising Readers included in an anthology of Maine stories for pediatricians to give to 5-year-olds. Melissa Sweet lives in Maine, and the Born to Read program recently visited her studio, where she read Love and Kisses aloud. You can… Read more

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Podcast Library Lion

Library Lion

Library Lion by Michelle Knudson, illustrated by Kevin Hawkes, is one of five books that Raising Readers included in an anthology of Maine stories for pediatricians to give to 5-year-olds. Kevin Hawkes lives in Maine, and the Born to Read program recently visited his studio, where he talked about Library Lion and read the first… Read more

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Podcast Donna Cassidy

Looking North

Donna Cassidy is Professor of American & New England Studies and Art History at the University of Southern Maine. Her most recent book, Marsden Hartley: Race, Region, and Nation, led to her current research on U.S. artists in Quebec and Atlantic Canada from 1890 to 1940. In this talk, co-sponsored by the Yarmouth and North… Read more

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Podcast in the Garden with Jane Austen

Jane Austen’s Gardens

Kim Wilson is the Wisconsin-based author of two books: Tea with Jane Austen and In the Garden with Jane Austen. Her presentation at the Maine Festival of the Book, “Jane Austen’s Gardens: Love in the Shrubbery,” was beautifully illustrated by a slide show. The images are not captured by this audio recording, but her comments… Read more

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Podcast the Body of This

The Craft of Writing: A Panel Discussion

Moderated by the publisher of Warren Machine Company, Ari Meil, this event was a discussion of why Maine provides such rich inspiration for writers, and what has brought the writers Lewis Robinson, Andrew McNabb, and Lisa Carey to their respective places in the literary world today. Lisa Carey is the author of Every Visible Thing,… Read more

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Podcast Maine Student Book Award

A Librarian’s Introduction to Rules

School librarian Connie Burns of South Portland is a steadfast supporter of the Maine Student Book Award program. Here, she presents the winning book from the 2006-07 school year: Rules (Scholastic, 2006) by Maine’s own Cynthia Lord. Part of the first chapter from the audiobook, performed by Jessica Almasy and published by Recorded Books, is… Read more

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Podcast the Well Dressed Ape

Meeting of the Apes

In this three-part episode, two particularly quick-witted and talkative apes, Hannah Holmes (The Well-Dressed Ape) and Bill Roorbach (Temple Stream), address their collisions with the rest of the natural world. Roorbach’s recent work has taken him into the woods and fields behind his own house, a primitive but not always private domain. Holmes has turned… Read more

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Podcast Ann Hood

Ann Hood

Ann Hood is the author, most recently, of The Knitting Circle and Comfort: A Journey Through Grief. Both new books deal with the loss of her 5-year old daughter, one through fiction and one through memoir. In this talk, she compares the two approaches and recalls episodes—both tragic and very, very funny—from her life. Hood… Read more

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Podcast Angus King

Angus King: Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address

To close the Lincoln Bicentennial Symposium on March 21, 2009, former Maine Governor Angus King read Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address. He also shared some thoughts about Lincoln, whom he includes in his course on “Leaders and Leadership” at Bowdoin College. Governor King served two four-year terms as Maine’s independent 71st governor. He works as an… Read more

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Podcast Thomas J. Brown

The Afterlife of Abraham Lincoln

Thomas J. Brown is Associate Professor of History at the University of South Carolina, where he also serves as Associate Director of the Institute for Southern Studies. He is a Distinguished Lecturer with the Organization of American Historians. In this lecture, Brown examined the ways in which debates over regionalism, race relations and governmental power… Read more

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Podcast Elizabeth D. Leonard

In the Aftermath of the Lincoln Assassination

Elizabeth D. Leonard is the John J. and Cornelia V. Gibson Professor of History at Colby College, where she has taught since 1992. Leonard is the author of three books on the Civil War era, and she is under contract to write the biography of Joseph Holt, Lincoln’s judge advocate general. In this talk, she… Read more

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Podcast Bruce Chadwick

The Rise of Abraham Lincoln

Before he was the leader of a nation torn apart by a Civil War, Abraham Lincoln was a young man growing up during tumultuous times in Illinois. In the first presentation of the Lincoln Bicentennial Symposium, historian Bruce Chadwick explained Lincoln’s rise to power from his first unsuccessful race for the state legislature to his… Read more

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Podcast Jill Duson

Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address

To open the Lincoln Bicentennial Symposium on March 21, 2009, Portland Mayor Jill Duson read Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. Mayor Duson is the Director of Rehabilitation Services, Maine Department of Labor. She is serving her third term on the Portland City Council. She has also served one term on the School Committee, where she was elected… Read more

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Podcast James T. Morgan

Sarah Caldwell and Prokofiev’s War and Peace

James T. Morgan was a long-time friend and colleague at The Opera Company of Boston of the late Sarah Caldwell, the most innovative opera director of mid-20th-century America and the first woman to conduct at the Metropolitan Opera. He worked with Caldwell on a production of the War and Peace opera by Sergei Prokofiev (pictured… Read more

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Podcast Charles Calhoun 2

Tolstoy and the Broken Body

Charles Calhoun is an independent historian and biographer who is Scholar in Residence at the Maine Humanities Council. He is working on books about Longfellow and Whitman in Civil War Washington and on the history of horsemanship in North America. Born in Monroe, Louisiana, he studied history at the University of Virginia and law at… Read more

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Podcast Arts and Equity

Thin Blue Lines

Thin Blue Lines is a project of Portland’s Arts & Equity Initiative. The project brings local poets and photographers together with Portland police officers and detectives to create poems and photographs that increase the public’s knowledge and appreciation of police work. The first product of this collaboration was a calendar that was sold as a… Read more

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Podcast Sheila McCarthy i

Shall We Dance? A Close Reading

Sheila McCarthy is Associate Professor of Russian at Colby College. She has a B.A. in Russian from Emmanuel College, an M.A. from Harvard in Russian Area Studies, and a Ph.D. from Cornell University in Russian literature. She teaches 19th-century Russian literature in Russian and in English. Here, she performs a close reading of three dance… Read more

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Podcast Justin Weir

Love and War in War and Peace

Justin Weir is Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Harvard University. He received a B.A. in Russian from the University of Minnesota and his master’s and doctoral degree in Russian literature from Northwestern University. He is co-editor and co-translator of Eight Twentieth-Century Russian Plays (2000) and author of The Author as Hero: Self and… Read more

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Podcast Chris Bohjalian

Chris Bohjalian: Skeletons at the Feast

Chris Bohjalian is the author of eleven novels, including the New York Times bestsellers The Double Bind, Before You Know Kindness, The Law of Similars, and Midwives. Bohjalian won the New England Book Award in 2002. His work has been translated into 25 languages and has sold over three and a half million copies. He… Read more

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Podcast Patricia Smith

Patricia Smith: Blood Dazzler

Patricia Smith is a 2008 National Book Award Finalist for Blood Dazzler, also the basis of a forthcoming dance/theater performance with Urban Bush Women. Her other books of poetry are Teahouse of the Almighty, winner of the National Poetry Series, the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and the Paterson Poetry Prize; Close to Death; Big Towns, Big… Read more

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Podcast Marilyn Nelson

Marilyn Nelson

Poet Marilyn Nelson is the author or translator of twelve books and three chapbooks. She has won numerous awards, including two Boston Globe—Horn Book Awards, and is a three-time National Book Award Finalist. From the American Library Association, her books have received Newbery, Coretta Scott King, and Michael L. Printz Honors. Other honors include two… Read more

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Podcast Suzanne Strempek Shea

Suzanne Strempek Shea

Suzanne Strempek Shea is the author of five novels: Selling the Lite of Heaven, Hoopi Shoopi Donna, Lily of the Valley, Around Again, and Becoming Finola. She has also written three memoirs, Songs From a Lead-lined Room, Shelf Life, and Sundays in America. Winner of the 2000 New England Book Award, which recognizes a literary… Read more

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Podcast Richard Hoffman

Stonecoast Faculty Flash Reading, Part 2

This episode is the continuation of the Stonecoast MFA Faculty “flash reading” from the winter residency in January 2009, in which each writer gets three minutes in which to share his or her work before introducing the next writer in the queue. The first reader is Richard Hoffman, who writes in multiple genres and here… Read more

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Podcast Jaed Coffin

Stonecoast Faculty Flash Reading, Part 1

One of the highlights of each 10-day residency in the Stonecoast MFA program is the “flash reading” by faculty members. Each writer gets three minutes in which to share his or her work before introducing the next writer in the queue. The flash reading from the winter residency in January 2009 began with Jaed Coffin… Read more

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Podcast Michael Steinberg

Michael Steinberg: Still Pitching

Michael Steinberg is a memoirist and the founding editor of the award-winning literary journal Fourth Genre: Explorations in Nonfiction. His latest book, Still Pitching, was chosen by ForeWord Magazine as the 2003 Small and Independent Press memoir/autobiography of the year. Other books include Peninsula: Essays and Memoirs from Michigan, The Fourth Genre: Contemporary Writers Of/On… Read more

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Podcast Gray Jacobik

Gray Jacobik: The Double Task

Gray Jacobik is author of three collections of poetry: The Double Task (University of Massachusetts Press), winner of the Juniper Prize, nominated for the James Laughlin Award and The Poet’s Prize; The Surface of Last Scattering (Texas Review Press), winner of the X. J. Kennedy Poetry Prize; and Brave Disguises (University of Pittsburgh Press), winner… Read more

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Podcast Rachel Sturman

India and Pakistan: The History Behind the Headlines

The goal of this day-long program was to provide an introduction to the complex web of politics, culture, and religion that has made South Asia both a volatile area and an emerging power. Rachel Sturman, Assistant Professor of History and Asian Studies at Bowdoin College, was the featured scholar. The recording is offered here in… Read more

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Podcast Colin Sargent

Colin Sargent

Colin Sargent is a playwright and author of three books of poetry. A graduate of the United States Naval Academy, he earned a Stonecoast MFA in creative writing and was awarded the Maine individual artist fellowship in literature. His screenplay “Montebello Ice” is under option at Gideon Films. Sargent is founding editor and publisher of… Read more

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Podcast Ying Chang Compestine

Revolution Is Not a Dinner Party

Another contender for a Maine Student Book Award in 2008-09 is Revolution Is Not a Dinner Party (Random House, 2007) by Ying Chang Compestine (pictured at right). This novel about life in China during the Cultural Revolution is based on the author’s own experiences. The first chapter from the audiobook, performed by Jodi Long and… Read more

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Podcast Emmy and the Incredible Shrinking Rat

Emmy and the Incredible Shrinking Rat

Emmy and the Incredible Shrinking Rat by Lynne Jonell, illustrated by Jonathan Bean (Henry Holt, 2007), is intended for children ages 8-12, but its whimsy and wit broaden its appeal. The novel was chosen as one of School Library Journal’s Best Books of 2007, and now it’s a contender for a Maine Student Book Award… Read more

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Podcast David Richards

Landscapes of Poland Spring

David Richards earned his Ph.D. in History from the University of New Hampshire. His research for the 2006 book Poland Spring: A Tale of the Gilded Age (University Press of New England) forms the basis of this presentation at the Yarmouth Historical Society. Richards is the assistant director of the Margaret Chase Smith Library in… Read more

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Podcast Blaine House

Blaine House Oral History

The Blaine House is the Governor’s residence in Augusta, Maine. At the 175th anniversary celebration of this historic house on August 16, 2008, historian Jo Radner interviewed some of its former residents and staff. Phyllis H. Siebert was the Blaine House chef from 1972 until her retirement in 2001. Cass Longley-Leahy is one of James… Read more

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Podcast Cynthia Voigt

Children’s Authors at the Blue Hill Library

Maine is home to many children’s authors and illustrators. Fans are usually only fortunate enough to see one at a time, but in July 2008, three of the best-known—Cynthia Voigt, Ruth Freeman Swain, and Rebekah Raye—appeared together at the Blue Hill Library. In this recording, they are introduced by Brook Ewing Minner, the library’s Assistant… Read more

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Podcast Maine Student Book Award

A Librarian’s Introduction to Moon Runner

School librarian Connie Burns of South Portland is a steadfast supporter of the Maine Student Book Award program. She presents one of the books on the list of contenders from the 2006-07 school year: Moon Runner (Candlewick, 2005) by Carolyn Marsden (pictured at right). After Connie introduces the main character, Mina, then previews the story… Read more

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Podcast Eve LaPlante

Eve LaPlante: Salem Witch Judge

Samuel Sewall, the only judge to publicly repent his decision to condemn twenty people to death as witches in 1692, is the subject of Eve LaPlante’s new biography, Salem Witch Judge: The Life and Repentance of Samuel Sewall (HarperOne, 2007). LaPlante counts Sewall as her sixth great-grandfather, a family connection that gave her access to… Read more

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Podcast Daniel Pearl

Beyond the Clash of Civilizations

The 2008 Douglas M. Schair Memorial Lecture on Genocide and Human Rights was a dialogue for Muslim-Jewish understanding, presented in cooperation with the Islamic Society of Portland and the Jewish Community Alliance of Southern Maine. The featured speakers were Judea Pearl and Akbar Ahmed. Pearl, a computer scientist from Israel, and Ahmed, a social scientist… Read more

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Podcast Linda Greenlaw

Linda Greenlaw: All Fishermen Are Liars

Linda Greenlaw’s three books about life as a commercial fisherman—The Hungry Ocean (1999), The Lobster Chronicles (2002), and All Fishermen Are Liars (2004)—have climbed as high as #2 on the New York Times bestseller list. Her first novel, Slipknot, began a mystery series whose second installment is Fisherman’s Bend (2008). Before becoming a writer, Greenlaw… Read more

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Podcast the Devil of Great Island

The Devil of Great Island

Emerson ‘Tad’ Baker of York, Maine, is a former chair of the Maine Humanities Council. An author and Professor of History at Salem State College, he directs several archaelogical excavations in New England and also served, from 2002 until its premier in 2004, as a lead consulant for the Emmy-nominated PBS TV series, “Colonial House.”… Read more

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Podcast Patrick Rael

Vietnam in the Context of the American Way of War

Patrick Rael is Associate Professor of History at Bowdoin College. His areas of interest include antebellum America, Civil War and Reconstruction, and comparative slavery. Among other publications, he has edited a volume of scholarship on African-American Activism Before the Civil War (Routledge, 2008). In this talk, Rael places the Vietnam conflict in a continuum of… Read more

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Podcast Margaret Jane Mussey Sweat

Margaret Jane Mussey Sweat

Connie Burns is a school librarian in South Portland with a hidden passion: the lives of Victorian women. In pursuit of her passion, Burns researched Margaret Jane Mussey Sweat (1823-1908) for her Master’s thesis in the American and New England Studies program at the University of Southern Maine. Sweat is best remembered for her bequest… Read more

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Portland Portland Freedom Trail

First Anniversary of the Portland Freedom Trail

“Weaving History and Literature: the African American Oral and Written Tradition” brought five writers together to read from their work and discuss how African American history is revealed through storytelling and literature. The speakers were JerriAnne Boggis, founder and director of the Harriet Wilson Project; Kate Clifford Larson, biographer of Harriet Tubman; novelists Michael C…. Read more

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Podcast Annaliese Jakimides

Annaliese Jakimides and A Coastal Companion

A Coastal Companion: A Year in the Gulf of Maine, from Canada to Cape Cod (Tilbury House, 2008) is part field guide, part almanac; a celebration of the natural world that also highlights people who have chosen the Gulf of Maine as the setting for their life’s work. Poems by contemporary Maine poets open each… Read more

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Lizz Sinclair

Interview with Lizz Sinclair

  Created by the Maine Humanities Council, Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health Care® is a national award-winning reading and discussion program for health care professionals. The Maine Public Broadcasting Network’s Tom Porter interviewed Literature & Medicine Program Officer Lizz Sinclair when the Literature & Medicine anthology, Imagine What It’s Like, was… Read more

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Nalo_Hopkinson

Nalo Hopkinson

Nalo Hopkinson is one of the world’s best known fantasy and science fiction writers. She is the author of four novels (most recently The New Moon’s Arms, Warner, 2007) and numerous short stories, and editor or co-editor of several anthologies, including So Long Been Dreaming: Postcolonial Visions of the Future (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2004). Hopkinson… Read more

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Podcast Deming-Alison-Hawthorne

Alison Hawthorne Deming

Alison Hawthorne Deming is the author of three books of poetry, three nonfiction books, and two limited-edition chapbooks. Her place-based writing has earned her fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown , the Arizona Commission on the Arts, and the Tucson/Pima Arts Council; as well as many… Read more

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Podcast Thanks-to-animals10-cover

A Conversation about “Thanks to the Animals”

When the Born to Read program selected books for its anti-bias initiative, Many Eyes, Many Voices, there was a distressing gap in the field of contenders: a suitable children’s book about Maine Native Americans. The few titles available were either too stereotypical or too distant—tales populated by warriors with headresses, or set amidst Plains buffalo… Read more

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Podcast Sleep Tight, Little Bear

Sleep Tight, Little Bear

Here is another story by Martin Waddell about Little Bear and Big Bear. It is read aloud by Rachel Davis, children’s librarian at the Thomas Memorial Library in Cape Elizabeth. Then Rachel shares two fingerplays. Text copyright 2005 by Martin Waddell. Illustrations copyright 2005 by Anita Jeram. Reproduced by permission of Candlewick Press, Inc., Somerville,… Read more

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Podcast you can do it sam

You Can Do It, Sam

Amy Hest’s third book about the bear named Sam is read aloud by Rachel Davis, children’s librarian at the Thomas Memorial Library in Cape Elizabeth. Rachel then teaches two fingerplays that you can do after you read the book. Text copyright 2003 by Amy Hest. Illustrations copyright 2003 by Anita Jeram. Reproduced by permission of… Read more

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Podcast Baby Brains

Baby Brains

Here’s a funny book by British author Simon James, read aloud by Rachel Davis, children’s librarian at the Thomas Memorial Library in Cape Elizabeth. After she reads the book, Rachel teaches a fingerplay called “The Baby Grows” and a poem called “Bend and Stretch.” Text and illustrations copyright 2004 by Simon James. Reproduced by permission… Read more

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Podcast Kiss Good Night

Kiss Good Night

This is the first book that author Amy Hest wrote about the bear named Sam, a character inspired by her own son, Sam. Here, the book is read aloud by Rachel Davis, children’s librarian at the Thomas Memorial Library in Cape Elizabeth. Rachel then teaches two fingerplays about kisses. Text and illustrations copyright 2004 by… Read more

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Charles Calhoun

Why Are Some Biographies So Good?

Charles Calhoun is Scholar in Residence at the Maine Humanities Council. He is the author of Longfellow: A Rediscovered Life (2004), A Small College in Maine: 200 Years of Bowdoin (1993), and the volume on Maine in the Compass American Guide Series (4th ed., 2005). Born in Monroe, Louisiana, he studied history at the University… Read more

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Podcast Nancy Riley

Family and Gender in Contemporary China

Nancy Riley is a professor of sociology at Bowdoin College whose work focuses on family, gender and population, and China. She has completed years of research in Dalian on the family lives of women factory workers, and taken groups of students (and one group of faculty) to Asia with the support of the Freeman Foundation…. Read more

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Podcast Miriam Colwell

Miriam Colwell

Miriam Colwell was born in Prospect Harbor in 1917 and still lives in the house built by her great-great-grandfather in 1817. She is the author of Wind Off the Water (1945), Day of the Trumpet (1947), and Young (1955). As a small town resident and long-time postmistress, she has watched change upon change wash over… Read more

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Podcast Robert Peter Tristram Coffin

Robert P. Tristram Coffin

The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Robert P. Tristram Coffin (1892-1955) was a native Mainer, Bowdoin College graduate, and longtime Bowdoin faculty member. Though a popular writer and speaker in his time, his work is not widely known today. In this podcast episode, Kevin Belmonte, who recently completed a Master’s thesis on Coffin for the American and… Read more

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Podcast Helen Nearing

The Good Life of Helen K. Nearing

For her doctoral dissertation in American history, scholar Mimi Killinger researched the life of homesteader and writer Helen Nearing. Her dissertation became the biography The Good Life of Helen K. Nearing (University of Vermont Press, 2007). Here, Killinger uncovers the roots of her project at the Good Life Center in Harborside, Maine, and reads excerpts… Read more

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Podcast Neil Rolde

Neil Rolde

Neil Rolde’s 2006 book, Continental Liar from the State of Maine, is a biography of James G. Blaine, the Maine politician who dominated the American political stage from just before the Civil War and almost until the twentieth century. A former Maine politician himself, Rolde is a prize-winning historian and author of Unsettled Past, Unsettled… Read more

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Podcast Jeff Shaara

Jeff Shaara

The Steel Wave is the second novel in what will be a trilogy of World War II stories by Jeff Shaara, who has also written about the Civil War, the American Revolution, the Mexican War, and the first World War. Shaara is the son of the late Michael Shaara, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Killer… Read more

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Podcast Lewis Robinson

Lewis Robinson

Lewis Robinson is the author of Officer Friendly and Other Stories and the forthcoming novel Water Dogs, due out from Random House in January 2009. A graduate of Middlebury College and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, he is the winner of a Whiting Writers’ Award and a PEN/Oakland-Josephine Miles Award. Here, he is introduced by fellow… Read more

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Podcast Shara McCallum

Shara McCallum

Shara McCallum is the author of two poetry collections, The Water Between Us (University of Pittsburgh, 1999, winner of the 1998 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize) and Song of Thieves (University of Pittsburgh, 2003). McCallum was born in Jamaica, where she lived until she was nine with Afro-Jamaican and Venezuelan parents. She directs the Stadler… Read more

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Ashley Bryan gives a presentation on his art, teaching, and children’s book illustration at the South Solon Meeting House, with his fresco mural painting in the background. (2007)
PHOTO: RICHARD GARRETT

Interview with Ashley Bryan

  Born and raised in New York City, Ashley Bryan is another author “from away” who has found a home in Maine. Folklorist, writer, illustrator and performer, Bryan draws on African myths and tales, his own and others’ experience, and his literary, artistic and thespian talents to create children’s books (enjoyed by adults, too) and… Read more

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Podcast Don't you feel well Sam?

Don’t You Feel Well, Sam?

Here is one of Amy Hest’s popular books about a bear named Sam, read aloud by Amy Hand, children’s librarian at the Camden Public Library. Text copyright 2002 by Amy Hest. Illustrations copyright 2002 by Anita Jeram. Reproduced by permission of Candlewick Press, Inc., Somerville, MA. We welcome your feedback on any of Amy Hand’s… Read more

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Podcast In the Rain With Baby Duck

In the Rain With Baby Duck

Amy Hest is the author of this book about a duck who learns to love the rain. Here is Amy Hand, children’s librarian at the Camden Public Library, reading the book aloud and sharing a rhyme and two songs. Text copyright 1995 by Amy Hest. Illustrations copyright 1995 by Jill Barton. Reproduced by permission of… Read more

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Podcast can't you sleep little bear

Can’t You Sleep, Little Bear?

Owl Babies is not the only bedtime book by Martin Waddell. He also wrote this book about a bear who cannot fall asleep. Amy Hand, children’s librarian at the Camden Public Library, reads the story aloud, then shares two rhymes and a song about the night sky. Text copyright 1988 by Martin Waddell. Illustrations copyright… Read more

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Podcast Andrew Walkling

Dido’s Lament: Virgilian Epic and 17th Century English Opera

Andrew Walkling is Dean’s Assistant Professor of Early Modern Studies at the State University of New York at Binghamton, where he teaches in the departments of art history, English, and theater and is affiliated with the faculties of history, music, and philosophy. He earned a Ph.D. in British history from Cornell. A Fellow of the… Read more

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Podcast Gary Lawless

Art for Justice: Using Writing to Create Social Change

Jennifer Hodsdon, a 2008 graduate of the Stonecoast program who now coordinates the Maine SpeakOut Project, led this discussion of some of the rewards and challenges that come from using writing as a transformative exercise to effect social change. The panelists were three Maine-based writer-activists—Gary Lawless (pictured at right), Cathy Plourde, and Chiara Liberatore—whose experiences… Read more

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Podcast Jody Fein

Peaceable Stories with Jody Fein

Storyteller Jody Fein visited the East End Community School in Portland on May 15, 2008, to tell stories to the Kindergarten, 1st Grade, and 2nd Grade. She selected the stories “Abiyoyo,” “Stone Soup,” and “The Wind and the Sun,” all of which tie into the Born to Read initiative Peaceable Stories. This event was part… Read more

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Podcast David Scott Kastan

Believing Shakespeare: Religion in Shakespeare’s World and in his Plays

David Scott Kastan is the Old Dominion Foundation Professor in the Humanities and Chair of the English Department at Columbia University. He specializes in 16th- and 17th-century literature and culture, Shakespeare, and the history of the book. He is the first American to serve as General Editor of the Arden Shakespeare, and he also served… Read more

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Podcast Alice Persons

Moon Pie Press

Three poets whose work has been published by the small, Maine-based Moon Pie Press, read together as part of the Portland Public Library’s Poetry Festival in April, 2008. Alice N. Persons, founder of Moon Pie Press, is a sometime English teacher and an adjunct instructor of business law at the University of Southern Maine. A… Read more

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Podcast John Ford in Focus,

Ford In Focus

Michael C. Connolly and Kevin Stoehr are the editors of John Ford in Focus, a collection of essays that offers a comprehensive examination of Ford’s life and career, revealing the frequent intersections between Ford’s personal life and artistic vision, including his roots in Portland. Stoehr is associate professor of humanities at Boston University and lives… Read more

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Podcast Patricia Hagge

Annie Finch and Patricia Hagge

Patricia Hagge and Annie Finch opened the library’s 2008 Poetry Festival with this reading. Hagge earned her MFA from the Stonecoast MFA program. She serves on the boards of SPACE Gallery and The Telling Room. Finch, who directs the Stonecoast program, is a professor of English at the University of Southern Maine. This reading was… Read more

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Podcast Victoria Mares-Hershey

How Did You Get Here?

Playwright Victoria Mares-Hershey’s “How Did You Get Here?” gives voice to Africans in Maine, during the period of slavery and beyond, by giving audiences a sense of their everyday lives. This reading of the play’s first act was recorded on March 21, 2008, at the Museum of African Culture on Brown Street in Portland. Museum… Read more

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Podcast Cowboy Baby

Cowboy Baby

This bedtime story by Sue Heap is set in the Wild West. As Rachel Davis, children’s librarian at the Thomas Memorial Library in Cape Elizabeth, reads the book aloud, you can follow along in your own copy or a copy borrowed from the library. Then, listen to some fingerplays about cowboys. Copyright 1998 by Sue… Read more

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Podcast Oliver Finds His Way

Oliver Finds His Way

While walking through the woods in autumn, Oliver chases a leaf and gets separated from his parents. This is the story of how he finds them again. It is read aloud by Rachel Davis, children’s librarian at the Thomas Memorial Library in Cape Elizabeth, who then shares two fingerplays about leaves. Text copyright 2002 by… Read more

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Podcast Only Joking, Laughed the Lobster!

Only Joking, Laughed the Lobster!

Colin West is a prolific British author who writes nonsense verse and humorous books, such as this one, about a lobster who takes his joking one step too far. Rachel Davis, children’s librarian at the Thomas Memorial Library in Cape Elizabeth, reads the book aloud and then teaches two fingerplays about the ocean. Copyright 1995… Read more

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Podcast Barbara Weiden Boyd

Translating Virgil

Barbara Weiden Boyd is the Henry Winkley Professor of Latin and Greek at Bowdoin College, where she has taught since 1980. She earned her Ph.D. at Michigan and has written extensively on Latin literature, notably two books on the poet Ovid. In recent years she has prepared a series of school texts and teachers’ guides… Read more

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Podcast Peter Aicher

The Rome of Augustus

Peter Aicher is Professor of Classics at the University of Southern Maine in Portland, where he frequently teaches courses on Homer and Virgil, in translation and in Greek and Latin. He combines these literary interests with a fascination with the city of Rome, which has resulted in several books and numerous articles and talks. He… Read more

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Podcast Michael C. J. Putnam

Virgil and History

Michael C. J. Putnam is MacMillan Professor of Classics and Professor of Comparative Literature at Brown University, where he has taught since 1961. Educated at Harvard, he has written 11 books on Latin literature and has edited four others. He is widely regarded as one of the leading interpreters of the work of Virgil. He… Read more

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Podcast Pamella Beliveau

Sharing Stories with Pamella Beliveau

Storyteller Pamella Beliveau has performed for children of all ages at libraries, schools, festivals and other children’s events throughout Maine and New England. She has created early childhood literacy programs at public libraries, done residency work at schools throughout the state, and been recognized by the Maine Arts Commission for her quality storytelling programs. Here,… Read more

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Podcast Cindy Williams GutiérrezPodcast Cindy Williams Gutiérrez

A Dialogue of Flower and Song

“A Dialogue of Flower and Song” is a one-act play written by Stonecoast student Cindy Williams Gutiérrez and performed here by Bridget Madden, Elsa Colón, Julie Manon, Luis Luque, and Kathleen Clancy. Gerardo Calderón of Grupo Condor provides live pre-Columbian music. The play re-imagines a 15th century Aztec literary event, drawing together three women poets… Read more

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Podcast Penelope Schwartz Robinson

Penelope Schwartz Robinson

Penelope Schwartz Robinson, a 2004 Stonecoast graduate in Creative Nonfiction, won the first Stonecoast Book Award for her essay collection Slippery Men. She received an honorarium and a publishing contract with New Rivers Press, a teaching press at Minnesota State University, Morehead. Slippery Men will be published and distributed nationally in the fall of 2008…. Read more

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Podcast Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas was nineteen when her father took his family to live among the Bushmen of the Kalahari. Fifty years later, after a life of writing and study, Thomas returns to her experiences in The Old Way: A Story of the First People. She recalls life with the Bushmen, one of the last hunter-gatherer… Read more

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Podcast Martha Tod Dudman

Martha Tod Dudman

Martha Tod Dudman’s first novel, Black Olives, turns her unflinching candor and sharp wit on reconstructing the end of a love affair. Dudman is the author of the powerful memoirs Augusta, Gone (which was adapted into an award-winning Lifetime Television movie) and Expecting to Fly. A professional fundraiser, Dudman lives in Northeast Harbor with her… Read more

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Podcast Tayari Jones

Tayari Jones

Tayari Jones was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia where she spent most of her childhood with the exception of the one year she and her family spent in Nigeria, West Africa. As a visiting writer at Stonecoast, Jones read from her newer novel, The Untelling (Warner, 2005). Her debut novel, Leaving Atlanta (Warner, 2002),… Read more

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Podcast Charles Martin

Charles Martin

Charles Martin is a renowned poet and translator. He is the author of six poetry collections, three of which have been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. His verse translation of Ovid”s Metamorphoses received the 2004 Harold Morton Landon Translation Award from the Academy of American Poets. In 2005, the American Academy of Arts and Letters… Read more

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Podcast Vicky Smith

Introduction to Early Literacy

Vicky Smith is the former director and children’s librarian at the McArthur Public Library in Biddeford. She is now the editor of children’s book reviews for Kirkus. She has been active in the Public Library Association’s early literacy program, Every Child Ready to Read, as well as the Council’s own Born to Read program. Drawing… Read more

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Podcast Owl Babies

Owl Babies

In this picture book by Martin Waddell, illustrated by Patrick Benson, three baby owls whose mother has gone out into the night try to stay calm until she returns. As Vicky Smith, editor of children’s book reviews for Kirkus, reads the book aloud, you can follow along in your own copy or a copy borrowed… Read more

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Author Maria Testa

A Tale of Three Cities

Author Maria Testa combines readings from her book for young adults, Something About America, with discussion of events in Lewiston and Kosovo that inspired the story. This presentation took place at the Portland Public Library. We welcome your feedback on this Maria Testa reading. Read more

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Rachel Fister’s Blister

Rachel Fister’s Blister

Amy MacDonald is a children’s book author who lives in Maine. The Portland Stage Company Affiliate Artists have created staged readings of three of Amy’s picture books, with different actors playing different characters. With Amy’s permission, their performance of Rachel Fister’s Blister is available here. This performance took place at a Portland Stage Company Open… Read more

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Please, Malese!,

Please, Malese!

Amy MacDonald is a children’s book author who lives in Maine. The Portland Stage Company Affiliate Artists have created staged readings of three of Amy’s picture books, with different actors playing different characters. With Amy’s permission, their performance of Please, Malese!, a trickster tale from Haiti, is available here. This performance took place at a… Read more

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Little Beaver and the Echo

Little Beaver and the Echo

Amy MacDonald is a children’s book author who lives in Maine. The Portland Stage Company Affiliate Artists have created staged readings of three of Amy’s picture books, with different actors playing different characters. With Amy’s permission, their performance of her very first picture book, Little Beaver and the Echo, is available here. This performance took… Read more

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Podcast Hannah Holmes

Interview with Hannah Holmes

Hannah Holmes took a geology class at the University of Southern Maine that led to a career as a science writer, someone who turns the facts of science into stories, sometimes mysteries, with exciting plots and intriguing characters. She has toured the world for Discovery, making the complexities of science comprehensible, and scientists comprehensibly human… Read more

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Interview with Sara Corbett and Mike Paterniti

Two journalists in one Portland household—and both write for the New York Times Magazine. Mike Paterniti and Sara Corbett are often away, however, laying the groundwork for their articles and books. Sometimes alone, as when Paterniti was Driving Mr. Albert: A Trip Across America with Einstein’s Brain (Dell, 2000). (Read an excerpt from the book… Read more

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Podcast William Bushnell

William Bushnell

In addition to reading books, we like to read about books, but few people know what book reviewers really do or how they do it. William Bushnell has been a professional book reviewer and freelance writer for thirteen years. He has more than 1,350 published pieces in thirty magazines and newspapers. He is professionally affiliated… Read more

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Flash Reading: Nonfiction and Drama

In this Stonecoast Faculty Flash Reading from January 2008, Tanya Maria Barrientos reads her essay “Se Habla Español,” published in Borderline Personalities: A New Generation of Latinas Dish On Sex, Sass & Cultural Shifting (HarperCollins, 2004). Then Michael Kimball performs a monologue from a short play in progress, entitled “Do You Know the Muffin Man?”… Read more

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Flash Reading: Fiction

One of the highlights of each 10-day residency in the Stonecoast MFA program is the “flash reading” by faculty members. Each writer gets three minutes in which to share his or her work before introducing the next writer in the queue. During the winter residency in January 2008, Joan Connor read her short short called… Read more

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Flash Reading: Poetry

One of the highlights of each 10-day residency in the Stonecoast MFA program is the “flash reading” by faculty members. Each writer gets three minutes in which to share his or her work before introducing the next writer in the queue. Here are five flash readings by Stonecoast poetry faculty, all recorded at the January… Read more

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The Place of Poetry

Maine poets Annie Finch and Baron Wormser led students and fellow Stonecoast faculty members in this wide-ranging conversation about the place of poetry. They based their discussion on two books: The Gift: Creativity and the Artist in the Modern World by Lewis Hyde and The Song of the Earth by Jonathan Bate. This workshop took… Read more

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Podcast Sue Miller

Sue Miller

Sue Miller is the best-selling author of nine works of fiction, including The Good Mother and While I Was Gone, and the nonfiction book The Story of My Father. Her new book, The Senator’s Wife, revolves around the marriages of two women—a young mother and the wife of a promiscuous politician—who live side by side… Read more

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Podcast voici the valley

Voici the Valley: Introduction

The Voici the Valley Cultureway celebrates the places and culture of the St. John Valley, where the United States and Canada meet along the St. John River. The St. John Valley is found at the top of the state of Maine with the neighboring province of New Brunswick. Fondly called “The Valley,” this international region… Read more

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Podcast voici the valley 2

Voici the Valley – Alliances and Adversities: Shifting of Affairs

The complete Voici the Valley Audio Story (available here) includes a thorough historical account of the deportation of the Acadian people from the Maritime Provinces in 1755, the territorial disputes that ensued, and the eventual settlement of the Valley in 1785 by Acadian refugees. This brief excerpt explains how, in the wake of the 1842… Read more

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Podcast bagosse

Voici the Valley – Law of the Lands: Dividing the Valley

Governments on both sides of the international border that runs through the Valley have made laws to regulate the crossing of people and goods. This segment offers a glimpse of how current residents feel about these laws and how their forebears got around them during Prohibition. At right: bagosse, which is homebrew or moonshine, depicted… Read more

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Podcast Jaed Coffin

Jaed Coffin

Six years ago, at the age of twenty-one, Jaed Muncharoen Coffin left New England’s privileged Middlebury College to be ordained as a Buddhist monk in his mother’s native village of Panomsarakram—thus fulfilling a familial obligation. Part armchair travel, part coming-of-age story, his debut book A Chant to Soothe Wild Elephants (Da Capo Press, 2009) chronicles… Read more

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Podcast Veneta Masson

Clinician’s Guide to the Soul

A former public health nurse with many years’ experience, Veneta Masson, R.N., M.A., is also the author of three books. Though no longer in practice, Veneta continues to explore healing art. The title of her newest collection, Clinician’s Guide to the Soul, was also the title of her conference workshop. “As a family nurse practitioner,… Read more

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Podcast Rita Charon

Keynote Presentation by Rita Charon

Rita Charon, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Clinical Medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University and the leader of the emerging field of Narrative Medicine. (Click here for a full bio.) As Director and Founder of Columbia’s Program in Narrative Medicine, she guides both aspiring and practicing health care professionals in… Read more

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Podcast voici the valley

Voici the Valley: Tales of Terrain: Shaping Land, Shaping People

This excerpt from the Voici the Valley Audio Story features Allagash resident Joe Kelly recalling his experiences as a logger and river driver in the time before the chain saw. You’ll also hear a French folk song about a river driver, performed by traditional singer Rachel LeBlanc. This recording is excerpted from the Voici the… Read more

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Podcast voici the valley

Voici the Valley – Character and Culture: Marking a Passage

This portion of the Audio Story delves into the rich cultural life of the valley, including its language, idioms, pronunciation, music, and the traditional arts. The region’s French heritage is manifest in interviews with artists and folklorists, as well as traditional singing and instrumental music. Agriculture and cuisine also make an appearance in this excerpt…. Read more

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Podcast Judy Schaefer

Writing Workshop with Judy Schaefer

Judy Schaefer, R.N.C., M.A., is a nationally recognized author, editor, lecturer, teacher, and advocate for patients as well as nurses. Her conference workshop was called “The Courage to Create: Finding Your Voice Through Writing.” If you have pen and paper handy while you listen, and pause the recording when Judy says to start writing, you… Read more

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Podcast Rafael Campo

“Fact” vs. “Truth” in Narrative of Illness

In this conference workshop, Rafael Campo, M.D., M.F.A., defines a “biocultural” narrative of the illness experience, in contrast to the restrictive biomedical narrative encountered in today’s health care setting. He explores how literary works by Frank O’Hara, Debra Spark, Abraham Verghese, and Veneta Masson issue an insistent invitation to share in diverse human experiences. Please… Read more

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Podcast Rafael Campo

Keynote Presentation by Rafael Campo

Rafael Campo, M.D., M.F.A., is a national award winning poet who is also a faculty member and practitioner of general internal medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. (Click here for a full bio.) His newest collection of poetry, The Enemy, was published in April 2007. He is a recipient of… Read more

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