Raffael Scheck

Program

Winter Weekend

Immerse yourself in a classic work of literature.

Contact

Anne Schlitt
Assistant Director
(207) 773-5051

Details

Winter Weekend

Winter Weekend teachers

Podcast | 20th Anniversary Winter Weekend

In this episode of Humanities on Demand we visit the 20th annual Winter Weekend, held March 10-11, 2017, at Bowdoin College. Read more

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Podcast | Khaled Fahmy | Naguib Mahfouz and 20th Century Egyptian History

Khaled Fahmy is a Professor of History at the American University in Cairo. With a BA in Economics, an MA in Political Science from AUC and a DPhil in History from the University of Oxford, Fahmy taught for five years at Princeton University, then for eleven years at New York University before joining AUC in… Read more

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Reza Jalali

Podcast | Demystifying Islam in “Palace Walk”

MHC Board Member Reza Jalali discusses the Winter Weekend 2017 text, Palace Walk, at Merrill Memorial Library in Yarmouth. A Muslim scholar, educator, and writer, he is the coordinator of multicultural student affairs at the University of Southern Maine and advises Muslim students at Bowdoin College. His most recent work includes the 2013 book Homesick Mosque and Other Stories… Read more

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Podcast | Reflecting on 20 Years of Winter Weekend

Listen to Winter Weekend founder and emcee Charles Calhoun reminisce about 20 years of Winter Weekend in our latest Humanities on Demand podcast. Read more

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Isabel Alvarez-Borland

Podcast | Isabel Alvarez-Borland | Language as Theme in “One Hundred Years of Solitude”

Isabel Alvarez-Borland, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Humanities in the Department of Spanish at the College of the Holy Cross, examines of the role of language and identity in One Hundred Years of Solitude at Winter Weekend 2016. Her books include Cuban-American Literature of Exile: From Person to Persona (1999) and Discontinuidad y ruptura en Guillermo… Read more

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Matthew Pettway

Podcast | Matthew Pettway | 100 Years of Solitude: Reading Through the Invisibility of Race

Matthew Pettway, Bates College, deconstructs the classic Latin American novel “100 Years of Solitude” through the lens of race at Winter Weekend on March 12, 2016. Matthew Pettway completed his doctorate in Hispanic Cultural Studies at Michigan State University in June 2010. Dr. Pettway joined the faculty at Bates College in August of the same year… Read more

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Podcast | Allen Wells | The Banana Strike, La Violencia, and the Cuban Revolution’s Impact on García Márquez’ One Hundred Years of Solitude

A speaker at Winter Weekend 2016, Allen Wells discusses “Interpreting the Past through the Prism of the Present:  The Banana Strike, La Violencia, and the Cuban Revolution’s Impact on García Márquez’ One Hundred Years of Solitude”.  Allen Wells is the Roger Howell, Jr. Professor of History at Bowdoin College. His scholarship focuses on modern Mexican history,… Read more

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Esther Rojas and Marianella Rojas, Sudacas

Video | Sudacas | A Taste of Colombian Music

The band Sudacas, composed of Berklee College of Music students, performed a few songs and shared some background on Colombian rhythms and instrumentation on March 12, 2016, at Winter Weekend. Sudacas was founded by Marianella Rojas (Venezuela, voice and percussion), and Esther Rojas (Colombia, bass). The duet creates a fusion of traditional music from their native countries with… Read more

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Matthew Pettway

Video | Matthew Pettway | 100 Years of Solitude: Reading Through the Invisibility of Race

Matthew Pettway, Bates College, deconstructs the classic Latin American novel “100 Years of Solitude” through the lens of race at Winter Weekend on March 12, 2016. Matthew Pettway completed his doctorate in Hispanic Cultural Studies at Michigan State University in June 2010.  Dr. Pettway joined the faculty at Bates College in August of the same… Read more

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Ilan Stavans

Podcast | Ilan Stavans | One Hundred Years of Solitude: The Bible of Latin America

Professor Ilan Stavans gave the keynote talk at our Winter Weekend program on March 11, 2016. He is the Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College where his teaching interests include popular culture in Hispanic America, world Jewish writers, and the cultural history of the Spanish language.     Read more

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Ilan Stavans

Video | Ilan Stavans | 100 Years of Solitude: The Bible of Latin America

Professor Ilan Stavans, Amherst College, gave the keynote talk at our Winter Weekend program on March 11, 2016. Ilan Stavans, Amherst College, has taught courses on a wide array of topics such as Spanglish, Jorge Luis Borges, modern American poetry, Latin music,Don Quixote, Gabriel García Márquez, Modernismo, popular culture in Hispanic America, world Jewish writers,… Read more

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Allen Wells

Podcast | Allen Wells | Winter Weekend 2016 Preview: Gabriel García Márquez and One Hundred Years of Solitude

In this special “Humanities on Demand” we preview Winter Weekend 2016 with Allen Wells, Professor of History at Bowdoin College. Professor Wells discusses “The Writing of One Hundred Years of Solitude: Gabriel García Márquez, Colombia’s La Violencia, and the Cuban Revolution During the Cold War” This talk was recorded on October 2, 2015 at the Brunswick Inn Read more

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Stephanie Yuhl Winter Weekend

Podcast | Stephanie Yuhl | The Resonant Strings of Remembering: The Visual Culture of Faulkner’s Plantation South

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s ‘Humanities on Demand’ podcast series is a recording of Stephanie Yuhl’s talk, “The Resonant Strings of remembering: The Visual Culture of Faulkner’s Plantation South.” This was recorded at Bowdoin College on March 7, 2015, as part of Winter Weekend 2015 with Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! Dr. Yuhl, a specialist in… Read more

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John Matthews Winter Weekend 2015

Podcast | John Matthews | Absalom, Absalom!: A Story of Stories.

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcast series is a recording of John Matthews’s talk, “Absalom, Absalom!: A Story of Stories.” This talk was recorded at Bowdoin College on March 7, 2015, as part of Winter Weekend 2015 with William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! Dr. Matthews is a Professor of English at… Read more

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Cedric Gael Bryant Winter Weekend 2015

Podcast | Cedric Gael Bryant | Reading Metaphor, Race, and the Problem of Knowing in “Absalom, Absalom!”

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcast series is a recording of Cedric Gael Bryant’s talk, “Reading Metaphor, Race, and the Problem of Knowing in Absalom, Absalom!.” This talk was recorded at Bowdoin College on March 7, 2015, as part of Winter Weekend 2015 with William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! Dr. Bryant… Read more

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William Ferris

Podcast | William Ferris | Memory and Sense of Place: William Faulkner and the American South

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s ‘Humanities on Demand’ podcast series is a recording of William Ferris’s talk, “Memory and Sense of Place: William Faulkner and the American South.” This was recorded at Bowdoin College on March 6, 2015, as part of Winter Weekend 2015 with Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! A widely recognized leader in Southern studies, African American music,… Read more

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Charles Calhoun Winter Weekend

Podcast | Charles Calhoun | My Kinsman Thomas Sutpen: Reflections on the Southern Past

This episode of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcast series is a recording of Charles Calhoun’s talk, “My Kinsman Thomas Sutpen: Reflections on the Southern Past.” This talk was recorded at Bowdoin College on March 7, 2015, as part of Winter Weekend 2015 with William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! Born in Louisiana, Charles Calhoun is… Read more

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Charles Calhoun Great Books

Charles Calhoun: Great Books

In this episode we join Charles Calhoun, author of the biography Longfellow: A Rediscovered Life and founder/emcee of Winter Weekend for a talk on great books. This is a recording of an event held on July 21, 2014 at the Thornton Oaks Retirement Community in Brunswick, Maine. Calhoun discusses the definition of a great book and… Read more

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Podcast Ray Miller

Raymond Miller: An “Unhappy Wanderer” on the Streets of St. Petersburg: Raskolnikov as Superfluous Man

This talk was delivered on March 8th as part of Winter Weekend 2014, Crime and Punishment. In it, Raymond Miller discusses the phenomenon of the superfluous man in Russian literature, and the ways in which Crime and Punishment’s Raskolnikov does and does not fit with his predecessors in that category. Raymond Miller is recently retired… Read more

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Podcast Julie Buckler

Julie Buckler: Dostoevsky’s St. Petersburg

Julie Buckler is Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Comparative Literature at Harvard University. She specializes in the cultural heritage of Imperial Russia. Buckler is author of The Literacy Lorgnette: Attending Opera in Imperial Russia and Mapping St. Petersburg: Imperial Text and Cityscape. Her new book project is titled Cultural Properties: The Afterlife of… Read more

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Podcast Gregory Freeze

Gregory Freeze: Dostoevsky and Russian Orthodoxy

In this talk, delivered on March 8th as part of Winter Weekend 2014, Gregory Freeze presents Dostoevsky and Russian Orthodoxy. Freeze is a professor of history at Brandeis, where he teaches courses on 19th and 20th-century Russian and German history. He is currently preparing two volumes, one a study of Church and Believers in Imperial… Read more

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Podcast Bill Todd

William Todd: Literature as a Profession in Dostoevsky’s Russia

Welcome to another of the Maine Humanities Council’s Humanities on Demand podcasts. Here, Professor William Todd gives a talk during Winter Weekend 2014 entitled Literature as a Profession in Dostoevsky’s Russia. Todd is Harry Tuchman Levin Professor of Literature at Harvard University, where he has taught Russian and Comparative Literature since 1988. His publications include… Read more

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Podcast Robin Miller

Robin Miller on Crime & Punishment: The Hum and Buzz of Implication

In this talk, delivered on March 7th as part of Winter Weekend 2014, Robin Feur Miller discusses Dostoevsky’s Crime & Punishment. She analyzes different readings of the novel and studies it through the lens of Dostoevsky’s own notebooks and letters. Miller is a professor of the humanities at Brandeis University. She teaches and studies the… Read more

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Podcast Lillian Nayder

A change that did him good: Lillian Nayder on Dickens, Women, Violence, Cure

In his introduction to this lecture given on March 9, 2013, scholar Charles Calhoun states, “In our own lifetime, I think one of the major events in Dickens scholarship has been the appearance of a biography by our next speaker, Lillian Nayder. And that is The Other Dickens: A Life of Catherine Hogarth .” Lillian Nayder… Read more

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Podcast Rosemarie Bodenheimer

Rosemarie Bodenheimer: Class, Shame and Aspiration

This talk was given on March 9, 2013 at Bowdoin College as part of the 2013 Winter Weekend programming. Rosemarie Bodenheimer is an English professor at Boston College and author  of  Knowing Dickens.  In this podcast she states, “Great Expectations is Dickens’s most profound exploration of shame and its perverse effects on the psychology of its hero.” Bodenheimer explores… Read more

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Podcast Diane Sadoff

Great Expectations: Dianne Sadoff on the Dickens Legacy and its Cinematic Afterlife

Dianne Sadoff, Professor of English at Rutgers University and author of Victorian Vogue: British Novels on Screen, delivered this talk as part of the 2013 Winter Weekend programming. The talk was held on March 9, 2013 at Bowdoin College. In this podcast she sets Great Expectations in the context of Dickens’s rise to fame and… Read more

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Podcast Dickens

The Transatlantic Friendship: Charles Calhoun on Longfellow and Dickens

As part of Brunswick Downtown Association’s 2013 Longfellow Days series, Charles Calhoun, author of biography Longfellow: A Rediscovered Life, examined the friendship between Longfellow and Charles Dickens. In this podcast he discusses the writers’ correspondence, Dickens’ visit to The United States, and Longfellow’s to London. Mr. Calhoun spoke to an audience at Bowdoin College’s Moulton Union, on February… Read more

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Podcast Joel Rosenthal

War, Peace, and Conflict Resolution: What Homer Has to Teach Us

This year’s Winter Weekend selection, Homer’s The Iliad, translated by Robert Fagles, takes place over 51 days, somewhere in the 9th or 10th year of the Trojan War. Amid a huge cast of memorable characters—and a crew of scheming Olympians sublimely indifferent to human suffering — three warriors stand out: the godlike and self-absorbed Achilles,… Read more

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Podcast Peter Aicher

Was There a Troy and Why Does It Matter?

This year’s Winter Weekend selection, Homer’s The Iliad, translated by Robert Fagles, takes place over 51 days, somewhere in the 9th or 10th year of the Trojan War. Amid a huge cast of memorable characters—and a crew of scheming Olympians sublimely indifferent to human suffering — three warriors stand out: the godlike and self-absorbed Achilles,… Read more

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Podcast Caroline Alexander

Reading the Iliad in 2012

The 2012 Winter Weekend selection, Homer’s The Iliad, translated by Robert Fagles, takes place over 51 days, somewhere in the 9th or 10th year of the Trojan War. Amid a huge cast of memorable characters—and a crew of scheming Olympians sublimely indifferent to human suffering—three warriors stand out: the godlike and self-absorbed Achilles, the Tony… Read more

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Podcast Charles Calhoun Red & Black

How To Lose Your Head When All About Are Keeping Theirs: Julien, Mathilde, and the Agony of Romanticism

The 2011 Winter Weekend selection, Stendhal’s The Red and the Black follows a young intellectual man from a provincial town who tries to make it in 19th century Paris. Stendhal’s psychological portrait of Julien Sorel and his love affairs mesh well with a satiric depiction of religious and society life. Charles Calhoun, independent scholar for… Read more

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Podcast Mary Rice-DeFosse

Pens and Pistol Shots: Crimes of Passion in Stendhal’s France

The 2011 Winter Weekend selection, Stendhal’s The Red and the Black follows a young intellectual man from a provincial town who tries to make it in 19th century Paris. Stendhal’s psychological portrait of Julien Sorel and his love affairs mesh well with a satiric depiction of religious and society life. Mary Rice-DeFosse, Professor of French… Read more

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Podcast Theresa McBride

Intimate Matters: Sex and Social Class in Post-Revolutionary France

The 2011 Winter Weekend selection, Stendhal’s The Red and the Black follows a young intellectual man from a provincial town who tries to make it in 19th century Paris. Stendhal’s psychological portrait of Julien Sorel and his love affairs mesh well with a satiric depiction of religious and society life. Theresa McBride, Chair of the History… Read more

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Podcast Diane Sadoff

The Reading Nation at Mid-Century: George Eliot’s Critics, Contemporaries, and Publishers

The Council’s annual Winter Weekend, a humanities seminar on a classic text, provides an opportunity for readers to confront, in a group setting, an important work of literature. Held at Bowdoin College in early March, the program begins with a Friday evening lecture and dinner (a gastronomic taste of the time and culture reflected in… Read more

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Charles Calhoun

Why Was There No British Revolution? The Political Economy of Middlemarch

The Council’s annual Winter Weekend, a humanities seminar on a classic text, provides an opportunity for readers to confront, in a group setting, an important work of literature. Held at Bowdoin College in early March, the program begins with a Friday evening lecture and dinner (a gastronomic taste of the time and culture reflected in… Read more

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Podcast Amy A Kass

Sympathy, Love and Marriage: Effective Reform in Middlemarch

The Council’s annual Winter Weekend, a humanities seminar on a classic text, provides an opportunity for readers to confront, in a group setting, an important work of literature. Held at Bowdoin College in early March, the program begins with a Friday evening lecture and dinner (a gastronomic taste of the time and culture reflected in… Read more

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Podcast James T. Morgan

Sarah Caldwell and Prokofiev’s War and Peace

James T. Morgan was a long-time friend and colleague at The Opera Company of Boston of the late Sarah Caldwell, the most innovative opera director of mid-20th-century America and the first woman to conduct at the Metropolitan Opera. He worked with Caldwell on a production of the War and Peace opera by Sergei Prokofiev (pictured… Read more

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Podcast Charles Calhoun 2

Tolstoy and the Broken Body

Charles Calhoun is an independent historian and biographer who is Scholar in Residence at the Maine Humanities Council. He is working on books about Longfellow and Whitman in Civil War Washington and on the history of horsemanship in North America. Born in Monroe, Louisiana, he studied history at the University of Virginia and law at… Read more

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Podcast Sheila McCarthy i

Shall We Dance? A Close Reading

Sheila McCarthy is Associate Professor of Russian at Colby College. She has a B.A. in Russian from Emmanuel College, an M.A. from Harvard in Russian Area Studies, and a Ph.D. from Cornell University in Russian literature. She teaches 19th-century Russian literature in Russian and in English. Here, she performs a close reading of three dance… Read more

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Podcast Justin Weir

Love and War in War and Peace

Justin Weir is Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Harvard University. He received a B.A. in Russian from the University of Minnesota and his master’s and doctoral degree in Russian literature from Northwestern University. He is co-editor and co-translator of Eight Twentieth-Century Russian Plays (2000) and author of The Author as Hero: Self and… Read more

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Podcast Andrew Walkling

Dido’s Lament: Virgilian Epic and 17th Century English Opera

Andrew Walkling is Dean’s Assistant Professor of Early Modern Studies at the State University of New York at Binghamton, where he teaches in the departments of art history, English, and theater and is affiliated with the faculties of history, music, and philosophy. He earned a Ph.D. in British history from Cornell. A Fellow of the… Read more

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Podcast Peter Aicher

The Rome of Augustus

Peter Aicher is Professor of Classics at the University of Southern Maine in Portland, where he frequently teaches courses on Homer and Virgil, in translation and in Greek and Latin. He combines these literary interests with a fascination with the city of Rome, which has resulted in several books and numerous articles and talks. He… Read more

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Podcast Michael C. J. Putnam

Virgil and History

Michael C. J. Putnam is MacMillan Professor of Classics and Professor of Comparative Literature at Brown University, where he has taught since 1961. Educated at Harvard, he has written 11 books on Latin literature and has edited four others. He is widely regarded as one of the leading interpreters of the work of Virgil. He… Read more

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