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Pulitzer Prize Centennial Campfires Initiative

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A special grant category for Maine-based organizations seeking to use Pulitzer Prize-winning writing, journalism, photography, drama, or music composition in their 2016 programming.

The Maine Humanities Council has received a grant of $34,300 from the Pulitzer Prize Centennial Campfires Initiative. The award will fund a special grant category for Maine-based organizations seeking to use Pulitzer Prize-winning writing, journalism, photography, drama, or music composition in their 2016 programming. The awards will range from $500 – $10,000. For more information and to apply>>

The Pulitzer Prize Centennial Campfires Initiative will generate grassroots events and conversations across the country throughout 2016 about the impact of journalism and the humanities on our lives and times, illuminating their value to public life today and imagining their future. “We intend to reach diverse audiences, using Campfire events to foster invigorating discussions – much as actual campfires create circles of conversation – both in person and through social media,” said Joyce Dehli, Pulitzer Prize Board member and chair of the Campfires Initiative. “We also hope to inspire new generations of practitioners.”

The Pulitzer Prize Board developed the initiative with the Federation of State Humanities Councils. It is supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Ford FoundationCarnegie Corporation of New York, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, as well as Columbia University, which is home to the Pulitzers.

“The Centennial is cause for celebration and commemoration, but it is also an opportunity to launch the Pulitzer Prizes’ second century in ways that deepen and inspire the public’s experience with great literature, history, music, drama and journalism,” said Keven Ann Willey, chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board’s Centennial Committee.

“The Council is very proud to have been awarded this grant and to offer Maine’s cultural and educational organizations a chance to highlight Pulitzer Prize-winning works and creators in their programming,” said MHC Executive Director Hayden Anderson. “We are pleased to offer this additional funding opportunity and look forward to seeing the resulting programs in 2016.”

A note about the initiative’s name: It was inspired by James L. Carey, late professor at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, who, as The New York Times reported in his obituary, considered journalism “our collective campfire storytelling.”